Buck Fuddy

Lara Chedraoui fanboy
May 22, 2009
9,332
Put Higuain on with Ronaldo and Dybala because he thought we deserved the win. That, in a nutshell, is what makes him different to Allegri.

Allegri would have played it safe 100% of the time.
That, in a nutshell, is bullshit.

Ronaldo, Higuain & Dybala were on the pitch together for less than 10 minutes.

Better yet, Dybala was subbed out for Can when the score was tied. I guess that means he was going for a draw :boh:
 

dolph

Senior Member
Mar 30, 2006
2,458
Winning is winning but i'd much rather watch this style of football vs that negative crap we were exposed to the last couple of years.

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The only reason it didn't work IMO is because Dybala was exhausted and couldn't keep up with the pace he was playing with earlier in the game.
That probably had something to do with it, but I would still rather have a trident of Ronaldo, Costa and Dybala. I think that trident have the perfect blend of technic, pace, creativity and goalscoring ability, without loosing balance or sacrificing to much in the high press.
 

Post Ironic

Senior Member
Feb 9, 2013
28,084
Whilst I hated how tedious we were to watch 'post Cardiff' under Allegri, his substitutes were often actually great.
:tup:
We were mostly terrible last year, and underperformed massively, aside from the very beginning of the year and the Atletico match...

But aside from the Tottenham matches (im which we still scored 4 goals playing on the counter), we had a pretty good 2017-18 as far as attacking goes. Our attack scored the most goals in club history in serie a with 86, we crushed Milan 4-0 in the Coppa final, and we scored 7 goals in our knockout matches against Tottenham and Madrid, only going out to the winners on a last second penalty.

There’s definitely been a lot of revisionism about that season because of the way we allowed Spurs to dominate possession in our tie with them.
 

MikeM

Senior Member
Sep 21, 2008
8,909
Allegri is just as attack-minded as Sarri. You could argue that he's even more attack-minded judging by how he played 3 strikers for almost an entire season. Every big match we played was wide open. If we ever chased the ball it was because we had too many attackers on the pitch and couldn't make up the numbers in midfield to secure the ball.

Of course both managers also pay attention to the defensive phase because they are good managers and not eplol style.

Yes, Allegri also had moments where he played on the counter, in the early days with the team. That's because he's pragmatic and intelligent. But we still scored goals from that.
 

Cerval

Senior Member
Premium
Feb 20, 2016
16,340
Being attack minded has more to do with approach and tactics than the number of offensive talents you put in the starting 11. For example Mandzu and Cuadrado were doing both offense and especially defence in 2017. They were instructed to track back
 

MikeM

Senior Member
Sep 21, 2008
8,909
Being attack minded has more to do with approach and tactics than the number of offensive talents you put in the starting 11. For example Mandzu and Cuadrado were doing both offense and especially defence in 2017. They were instructed to track back
Well they have the capacity to do that so I don't see the harm. They have also played like that with every other coach in their careers.

To me, a defensive coach is a coach that uses the *obvious* defensive tactics. Like one striker, 5 midfielders, and 5 metres between the lines. Allegri never did that. He barely ever played with a lone striker so right away he is less defensive than some other teams.

If you look at all the big knockout matches, they are wide open.

2018/19:
Ajax: 3 goals
Ajax: 2 goals
Atletico: 3 goals
Atletico: 2 goals

2017/18:
Real: 4 goals
Real: 3 goals
Spurs: 3 goals
Spurs: 4 goals

2016/17:
Cardiff Real: 5 goals
Monaco: 3 goals
Monaco: 2 goals
Barca: 0 goals
Barca: 3 goals

2015/16:
Bayern: 6 goals
Bayern: 4 goals

2014/15:
Barca final: 4 goals
Real: 2 goals
Real: 3 goals
Monaco: 0 goals
Monaco: 1 goal
Dortmund: 3 goals
Dortmund: 3 goals
 

dolph

Senior Member
Mar 30, 2006
2,458
Allegri is just as attack-minded as Sarri. You could argue that he's even more attack-minded judging by how he played 3 strikers for almost an entire season. Every big match we played was wide open. If we ever chased the ball it was because we had too many attackers on the pitch and couldn't make up the numbers in midfield to secure the ball.

Of course both managers also pay attention to the defensive phase because they are good managers and not eplol style.

Yes, Allegri also had moments where he played on the counter, in the early days with the team. That's because he's pragmatic and intelligent. But we still scored goals from that.
In terms of formation and personel there is some similarities, but their approach to the game is totaly different.
Allegri likes to play with a deeper defensive line, he does not mind handing over possesion and play on the break, he mostly have teams who move the ball from side to side, taking fewer risks in the build up. Sarri is the complete opposite, which is evident from pretty much any interview with over players about the change in approach this year.
IMO that constitutes a more offensive approach to the game.
 
Jan 16, 2013
19,501
In terms of formation and personel there is some similarities, but their approach to the game is totaly different.
Allegri likes to play with a deeper defensive line, he does not mind handing over possesion and play on the break, he mostly have teams who move the ball from side to side, taking fewer risks in the build up. Sarri is the complete opposite, which is evident from pretty much any interview with over players about the change in approach this year.
IMO that constitutes a more offensive approach to the game.
Have to agree with this. But yeah Allegri was never a defensive coach either.
 

MikeM

Senior Member
Sep 21, 2008
8,909
In terms of formation and personel there is some similarities, but their approach to the game is totaly different.
Allegri likes to play with a deeper defensive line, he does not mind handing over possesion and play on the break, he mostly have teams who move the ball from side to side, taking fewer risks in the build up. Sarri is the complete opposite, which is evident from pretty much any interview with over players about the change in approach this year.
IMO that constitutes a more offensive approach to the game.
Their approach is different, I completely agree. But I think they want similar things. Allegri wanted goals. Not a 1-0 result. Of course, that shows up in the data, because rarely were there fewer than 2 or 3 goals in a pivotal match. Allegri never aimed for a 0-0 or a 1-0 in my opinion.

If you want to say Sarri is more offensive, it's not crazy. But I think neither manager wants to aim for a 1-0.
 

Nenz

Senior Member
Apr 17, 2008
9,987
these 3 players were on the pitch for no more than 9 minutes. then sarri saw that we lost balance, dybala was exhausted, without berna, brozovic is getting too much freedom so inda begun to control the midfield, so he made a wise choice of removing dybala and introducing an other mid.

allegri never had both cr and higuain at the same time, but his go-to starter attacking trio was mandzukic, ronaldo and dybala.
Yes this is true. But he said it himself in the post-match - he wanted to have a ping with those three, even just for those nine minutes, to see if we could snatch victory. I reckon once we got to the 70' mark his prudent side took over and that's when he took Dybala off.

The point is that he showed the balls to go for the result away from home against the league leaders, even if it didn't have the desired effect. And moreover, he identified as much and made another good change. So, respect to the man.
 

Nenz

Senior Member
Apr 17, 2008
9,987
:rofl:

Allegri is the guy who digured out how to field Higuain, Manduzkic, Dybala and Cuadrado at the same time.
You smug little bastard. Breaking out the rofl on me.

You've missed the point. Yes, those are all at least supposed to be attacking players. And on paper is looks like an attacking approach to field them together. But if you'd bothered to pay attention to what he did with those players, you'd see how unattacking the way he fielded them was.

He experimented with Mandzukic and Dybala. One experiment was a stroke of tactical genius the other was a wanton disaster. But what makes your point moot is that the two were not instructed to serve their usual functions as strikers but to basically clog up an undermanned midfield. Not exactly going on the front foot, more a novel reinterpretation of his stubbornly prudent approach.

Dybala was made completely ineffectual by Allegri. He dragged Dybala into his protracted form slump that he looks to only now be recovering from by confusing his function. Mandzukic was a de facto left-midfielder which came off a treat but it wasn't an attacking move. To add, it made our attack lopsided and predictable. Cuadrado would charge down the channel and whip the ball to the far post where Mandzukic would be waiting. A move that came off many times but it still made us very predictable. Sarri values symmetry where he can achieve it and there's a very good reason for that.
 

IlCapitano

Senior Member
Dec 16, 2012
1,300
Super attacking mastermind Maurizio Sarri goals per game in his career: 1.58
Super defensive-only-individual-quality Allegri: 1.77

They both started managing in 04/05, they both managed in lower leagues until this decade and Sarri is on his 3rd bigger team to Allegri's 2.

Allegri goals per game in 16/17 when we played with 3 strikers + Cuadrado: 2.01. Klopp at Liverpool for comparison: 2.14. But not offensive I guess.
 

Vlad

Delusional
May 23, 2011
18,479
Super attacking mastermind Maurizio Sarri goals per game in his career: 1.58
Super defensive-only-individual-quality Allegri: 1.77

They both started managing in 04/05, they both managed in lower leagues until this decade and Sarri is on his 3rd bigger team to Allegri's 2.

Allegri goals per game in 16/17 when we played with 3 strikers + Cuadrado: 2.01. Klopp at Liverpool for comparison: 2.14. But not offensive I guess.
:lol: nailed it
 

il brutto

Senior Member
Jun 6, 2015
7,631
Super attacking mastermind Maurizio Sarri goals per game in his career: 1.58
Super defensive-only-individual-quality Allegri: 1.77

They both started managing in 04/05, they both managed in lower leagues until this decade and Sarri is on his 3rd bigger team to Allegri's 2.

Allegri goals per game in 16/17 when we played with 3 strikers + Cuadrado: 2.01. Klopp at Liverpool for comparison: 2.14. But not offensive I guess.
Flawed stats, because you didn't deduct individual brilliance and set-piece goals :stuckup:.