swag

L'autista
Administrator
Sep 23, 2003
75,954
I frequently meet with a group of reps from a Chinese vendor. Its two guys and two very good looking young ladies.

The two guys wear cheap proletariat looking clothes and don't even comb their hair. They do all the talking.

The two women are very well dressed (business but sexy) made up, hair done. They never speak, just greet us then sit there and smile.
They probably wear matching lipstick and synchronize their demure giggles at all of those slobs' jokes too.

Awww, you've made your own migrant detention camp. So cool. :D
 

Ali

Conditioned
Contributor
Jul 15, 2002
15,537
  • Ali

    Ali

At what point do you consider yourself able to say that you know a language? When you could have a casual conversation on the street? After a certain word count?
If you can read and understand an article in the newspaper, understand the news on TV, get through a doctor's visit, do some shopping at the supermarket and can chat up a girl then you are good to go.
 

JuveJay

起死回生
Moderator
Mar 6, 2007
61,455
At what point do you consider yourself able to say that you know a language? When you could have a casual conversation on the street? After a certain word count?
There are framework proficiency levels across different organisations. I always find the CEFR markers as fairly decent.

The Council of Europe’s Common European Framework of References (CEFR) for Languages groups language learners into concrete proficiency levels, where fluency and accuracy are just two of many examined criteria. The CEFR – available in 40 languages – divides proficiency into six “can do” levels – A1, A2, B1, B2, C1, and C2. A corresponds to “Basic” levels, B to “Independent”, and C to “Proficient.” Observable skills include:

A1: Capabilities range include basic introductions and answering questions about personal details provided the listener speaks slowly and is willing to cooperate.

A2: Can describe in simple terms aspects of his/her past, environment and matters related to his/her immediate needs and perform routine tasks requiring basic exchanges of information.

B1: Can deal with most daily life situations in the country where the language is spoken. Can describe experiences, dreams and ambitions and give brief reasons for opinions and goals.

B2: Can understand the themes of complex texts on both concrete and abstract topics and will have achieved a degree of fluency and spontaneity, which makes interaction with native speakers possible without significant strain for either party.

C1: Can understand a wide range of longer texts and recognise subtleties and implicit meaning; producing clear, well-structured and detailed text on complex subjects, showing controlled use of organisational patterns, connectors and cohesive devices.

C2: Can understand virtually everything heard or read, expressing themselves spontaneously, very fluently and precisely, while differentiating finer shades of meaning even in highly complex situations.
In my opinion I would class B2 as being fluent enough to claim that you can speak a language "fluently". That is an accurate claim. C2 is essentially language mastery, native speaker level but perhaps with a discernible accent. The only language I definitely speak at that level is my native English.
 
Jun 17, 2011
18,725
There are framework proficiency levels across different organisations. I always find the CEFR markers as fairly decent.



In my opinion I would class B2 as being fluent enough to claim that you can speak a language "fluently". That is an accurate claim. C2 is essentially language mastery, native speaker level but perhaps with a discernible accent. The only language I definitely speak at that level is my native English.
This is interesting. I think It'd have to agree with B2, maybe B1.

Same :sigh:. It's very impressive to me that people can seem to learn other languages to this level.
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 3, Guests: 14)