Turkey (1 Viewer)

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Senior Member
Contributor
Sep 4, 2006
72,536
Erdogan is bound to visit Greece tomorrow, a very difficult visit, esp because of the time, as last week in Athens police arested Kurdish terrorists with bombs, today Athens is burning from Anarchists and Tomorrow Trump will announce Jerusalem as Israel's capital city and there will be huge protests in defense of the Palestinians.
And of course, the reason a Turkish president wasn't invited in the past 65years in Greece, his request to visit Thrace, was granted and there abound to be incidents with political and diplomatical ramifications.
However yesterday Erdogan gave an interview to a Greek journalist full of provocative questions and the elegance he displayed again was astonishing! Trully the greatest politician the Balkans have seen in the past decade!
He was asked about a possible war, teritorial claims from Turkey and even about the Tyrant claims and each and every of his answers were impeccable! Some tricky ones took a loose response, but many were direct, emotional and trully meaningful!
He really is not there by chance, a trully capable politician! I hate populism and hypocrites, but this is what the majority wants and it's trully admirable how Erdogan reacted in questions baked to annihilate such a politician! Turk is right to be proud of him, i am ashamed of Tsipras...
:shifty:
 

Maddy

Oracle of Copenhagen
Jul 10, 2009
16,503
Majority of German, Austrian, and Danish turks voting for Erdogan, and soem people still wonder why right wing anti-immigration parties have such great backing in Europe.

:howler:
 

Tomice

Senior Member
Mar 25, 2009
2,369
The exact same thing happened with the turkish referendum a year back.

The rejection of democratic values while enjoying life under them is mind boggling cynical.
 

Fred

Senior Member
Oct 2, 2003
40,759
You do have to wonder why they thought they needed to leave an Erdogan led country in the first place if he was that great, or if they left a long time ago, why they don't go back.

We have a lot of these types in the Arab world, they sing their country's dictator's praises everywhere, they cry foul international and western conspiracies against their beloved leader, but most of the time they don't even live in their countries.
 

icemaη

Rab's Husband - The Regista
Moderator
Aug 27, 2008
30,367
You do have to wonder why they thought they needed to leave an Erdogan led country in the first place if he was that great, or if they left a long time ago, why they don't go back.

We have a lot of these types in the Arab world, they sing their country's dictator's praises everywhere, they cry foul international and western conspiracies against their beloved leader, but most of the time they don't even live in their countries.
It's a trend in most of the developing world I think.
 

Hængebøffer

Senior Member
Jun 4, 2009
24,885
You do have to wonder why they thought they needed to leave an Erdogan led country in the first place if he was that great, or if they left a long time ago, why they don't go back.

We have a lot of these types in the Arab world, they sing their country's dictator's praises everywhere, they cry foul international and western conspiracies against their beloved leader, but most of the time they don't even live in their countries.
Isn’t mostly of Erdogans support from rural and poor areas of Turkey? It kinda shows which people we have here. I find it disgusting that we have pro Erdogan Turks here watching other Danish-Turks and report back to the Turkish government, if they’re anti-Erdogan.
 

Tomice

Senior Member
Mar 25, 2009
2,369
You do have to wonder why they thought they needed to leave an Erdogan led country in the first place if he was that great, or if they left a long time ago, why they don't go back.

We have a lot of these types in the Arab world, they sing their country's dictator's praises everywhere, they cry foul international and western conspiracies against their beloved leader, but most of the time they don't even live in their countries.
I think having a "father of the nation" type figure is deeply rooted in Arabic culture/mentality. Not living under one sadly makes it easier to support the idea as the consequences of it don't apply to you.

It's actually been holding Arab countries back more than the religion itself imo. It runs in a complete contradiction to democracy, nothing in Islam at its core goes against democracy as far as I know, slight adjustment notwithstanding.


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The War in Syria is the best thing that has happened to Erdogan. By controlling the numbers of refugees coming into Europe he gets a free pass.
absolutely correct
 

Fred

Senior Member
Oct 2, 2003
40,759
icemaη;5776515 said:
It's a trend in most of the developing world I think.
True.

Isn’t mostly of Erdogans support from rural and poor areas of Turkey? It kinda shows which people we have here. I find it disgusting that we have pro Erdogan Turks here watching other Danish-Turks and report back to the Turkish government, if they’re anti-Erdogan.
I'm not in the least bit surprised, that is what happens in police states. In fact back in Geddaffi's era, despite the fact that I've lived all of my life abroad, I would never dare criticize Geddaffi in front of other Libyans abroad because of how widespread these informers to the state were. Even if I never intended to go back to Libya, they could even do things like refuse to renew my passport for example. That is unfortunately what Erdogan is now turning Turkey into.

As for your point about only people in rural areas voting for Erdogan, I think he used to be very popular in the big cities as well initially, back when he was actually good for the economy, and most people who voted for him, did so for reasons that had nothing to do with ideology.

I think having a "father of the nation" type figure is deeply rooted in Arabic culture/mentality. Not living under one sadly makes it easier to support the idea as the consequences of it don't apply to you.

It's actually been holding Arab countries back more than the religion itself imo. It runs in a complete contradiction to democracy, nothing in Islam at its core goes against democracy as far as I know, slight adjustment notwithstanding.


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absolutely correct
No doubt; in fact most of the arab world's tradition and customs have so much more to do with culture than the religion. I could give you so many examples I can make a thread out of it. But for the most part culture always trumps religion in the Arab world, even if most people would never admit that.

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icemaη;5776515 said:
It's a trend in most of the developing world I think.
True.

Isn’t mostly of Erdogans support from rural and poor areas of Turkey? It kinda shows which people we have here. I find it disgusting that we have pro Erdogan Turks here watching other Danish-Turks and report back to the Turkish government, if they’re anti-Erdogan.
I'm not in the least bit surprised, that is what happens in police states. In fact back in Geddaffi's era, despite the fact that I've lived all of my life abroad, I would never dare criticize Geddaffi in front of other Libyans abroad because of how widespread these informers to the state were. Even if I never intended to go back to Libya, they could even do things like refuse to renew my passport for example. That is unfortunately what Erdogan is now turning Turkey into.

As for your point about only people in rural areas voting for Erdogan, I think he used to be very popular in the big cities as well initially, back when he was actually good for the economy, and most people who voted for him, did so for reasons that had nothing to do with ideology.

I think having a "father of the nation" type figure is deeply rooted in Arabic culture/mentality. Not living under one sadly makes it easier to support the idea as the consequences of it don't apply to you.

It's actually been holding Arab countries back more than the religion itself imo. It runs in a complete contradiction to democracy, nothing in Islam at its core goes against democracy as far as I know, slight adjustment notwithstanding.


- - - Updated - - -



absolutely correct
No doubt; in fact most of the arab world's tradition and customs have so much more to do with culture than the religion. I could give you so many examples I can make a thread out of it. But for the most part culture always trumps religion in the Arab world, even if most people would never admit that.
 

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