Storms lash Europe (1 Viewer)

Slagathor

Bedpan racing champion
Jul 25, 2001
22,708
#1
A massive storm has pounded Northwestern Europe over the past weekend.

http://edition.cnn.com/2005/WEATHER/01/10/europe.storm.ap/index.html

Below is a map of the region; the yellow block line is the path of the storm which came from the west and moved east.

The countries in red have all reported terrential rains, massive flooding, power outages, extensive damage to buildings and infrastructure and even deaths!

The countries in green have had no trouble whatsoever.

Are you noticing anything yet? Holland, the most vulnerable nation in the region, is the only country to have withstood this storm without any trouble (thanks to its ingenious delta works system).

Suckers! :D


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Stephañho!

Junior Member
Aug 1, 2002
443
#3
Is there some sort of micro-climate protecting the Netherlands? :D

Seriously, it blew a bit here last night but nothing like a gale. Quite in fact there have been no report in the media of any major problem let alone casualties.

I understand the most affected regions were the UK and Scandinavia.
 

Tom

The DJ
Oct 30, 2001
11,726
#4
Yeah, north of England was torrential in ome places. Several have died, there have been up to and over a metre of water in some places.. thankfully not here in the midlands though.
 

Zlatan

Senior Member
Jun 9, 2003
23,029
#5
++ [ originally posted by Paolo_Montero ] ++
You can be a right gimp at times :D
What, only at times? :D


On topic tho, as far as natural disasters are concerned, I'm pretty safe. No volacanoes, floods, tornados, hurricanes, tsunamis, etc, only minor earthquakes once in a while :)
 

Zlatan

Senior Member
Jun 9, 2003
23,029
#8
++ [ originally posted by Stephañho! ] ++
Noone's totally safe, Zlatan! Watch your back!
You're right, but luckily nothing major has ever happned here, so I'm hoping it wont in the future. No tectonic plates, the sea aint nowhere near, only real risk are floods, especially as Sarajevo is surrounded by mountains. If there was a major storm for a few days and all that water started flowing down from the hills, we'd be fecked :D
 

Daddi

In Conte we trust!
Oct 27, 2004
7,889
#12
Man, the wind was really powerful. 300.000 swedes' electricity were out (including mine):( and It was really not fun...
I had to stay inside the whole day. trees were falling and sh1t...
 

aressandro10

Senior Member
Jul 30, 2003
2,884
#14
yeah..the nature is going ballistics... prior to the tsunami there was a big unprecedented flood on the east coast of peninsular malaysia.... then come that unprecedented tsunami...the snow at UAE...
 

aressandro10

Senior Member
Jul 30, 2003
2,884
#16
UAE sees snow for first time ever
DUBAI (AFP) Dec 30, 2004
Snow has fallen over the United Arab Emirates for the first time ever, leaving a white blanket over the mountains of Ras al-Khaimah as the desert country experienced a cold spell and above-average rainfall.

Dubai airport's meteorology department told AFP Thursday that snow fell over the Al-Jees mountain range in Ras al-Khaimah, which is the most northerly member of the UAE federation.

The English-language Gulf News reported that the mountain cluster, 5,700 feet (1,737 metres) above sea level, "had heavy night-time snowfall for the past two days as a result of temperatures dropping to as low as minus five Celsius (23 Fahrenheit)" and stunning the emirate's residents.

On Monday, 12.6 millimetres (half an inch) of rain fell on the desert emirate of Dubai, where it hardly ever rains, as police reported 500 accidents on its roads in 24 hours, including one fatality, as a result of a three-day downpour.

A cold spell has hit the country this week, with the mercury plunging to 12 degrees Celsius (53.6 Fahrenheit) in Dubai on Wednesday night.

The meteorology department, however, said the chilly weather in Dubai, where summer temperatures reach 50 Celcius (122 Fahrenheit), will probably end by next week
 
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Slagathor

Slagathor

Bedpan racing champion
Jul 25, 2001
22,708
#17
++ [ originally posted by John #10 ] ++
delta works system is ingenius, im currently studying them at uni.....shame about the cost tho!
If you need any additional information - I'm from the south west! If I go to my parent's place there (I live in The Hague right now) I always have to drive over those dams.
 

Elnur_E65

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2004
10,848
#18
++ [ originally posted by aressandro10 ] ++
UAE sees snow for first time ever
DUBAI (AFP) Dec 30, 2004
Snow has fallen over the United Arab Emirates for the first time ever, leaving a white blanket over the mountains of Ras al-Khaimah as the desert country experienced a cold spell and above-average rainfall.

Dubai airport's meteorology department told AFP Thursday that snow fell over the Al-Jees mountain range in Ras al-Khaimah, which is the most northerly member of the UAE federation.

The English-language Gulf News reported that the mountain cluster, 5,700 feet (1,737 metres) above sea level, "had heavy night-time snowfall for the past two days as a result of temperatures dropping to as low as minus five Celsius (23 Fahrenheit)" and stunning the emirate's residents.

On Monday, 12.6 millimetres (half an inch) of rain fell on the desert emirate of Dubai, where it hardly ever rains, as police reported 500 accidents on its roads in 24 hours, including one fatality, as a result of a three-day downpour.

A cold spell has hit the country this week, with the mercury plunging to 12 degrees Celsius (53.6 Fahrenheit) in Dubai on Wednesday night.

The meteorology department, however, said the chilly weather in Dubai, where summer temperatures reach 50 Celcius (122 Fahrenheit), will probably end by next week
That's what I was talking about. 500 accidents!

Something's definitely going on with world weather. Is El Nino coming up this year?
 

Bjerknes

"Top Economist"
Mar 16, 2004
101,779
#19
Erik, can you explain to me what exactly the Delta System is?

And the world of weather has been very strange of late, with many different problems all over the globe. From the devestating Earthquake in Asia to the massive storm system that has come ashore on the west coast of the United States, to now this European system, mother nature has not been treating us too kindly. This year has actually been very harsh, as it seems like Tropical Storms in the Atlantic have taken different paths and the numbers of devestating hurricanes making landfall have risen. From that to the Tsunami and now these rather huge storm systems off our coasts, the climate of the world seems to be changing a bit. However, you never know with the weather.

Yes Elnur, this is an El Nino year, and that usually spells trouble for the Western coast of the U.S.
 
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Slagathor

Slagathor

Bedpan racing champion
Jul 25, 2001
22,708
#20
++ [ originally posted by Andy ] ++
Erik, can you explain to me what exactly the Delta System is?
The delta works is a system of dams and other similar inventions of high standard technology that know now equal in the world. They have been designed in the second part of the twentieth century to keep Holland from flooding. Everything West of the red line on the map I attached lies beneath sea-level so it's a very vulnerable country of course. The area that lies beneath sea level is inhabited by a total of 10 million people.

The last major flood was on February 1st 1953 when a northwestern storm hit the nation with full force hurricane winds. Dykes and dunes broke all over the western shore line; cities were lost and thousands of people died. Holland lost a staggering 15% of it's total surface to the sea that night.

Only 10% has been regained and that land is no protected by the deltaworks, of which the most impressive dam is the Oosterscheldt barrier:



When a major storm is headed for the Netherlands, the gates in this dam go down and it shuts off a sea-arm that is 8 kilometers (5 miles) wide, protecting the lives of 3 million people who live behind it.

The official website of the deltaworks can be found on http://www.deltawerken.com/ and it contains LOADS of information in English.

ALSO: what you might find interesting is that the American Society of Civil Engineering called the North Sea Protection Works (the official name of the deltaworks) one of the seven wonders of the modern world.
http://www.asce.org/history/seven_wonders.cfm

Again, on the map below; everything west of the red line lies beneath sea level. The yellow lines are the dams of the deltaworks. The yellow arrow points to the Oosterscheldt barrier.
 

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