Premier League 2020-21 (2 Viewers)

Gian

COME HOME MOGGI
Apr 12, 2009
17,063
Lampard was one of my favorite players ever, but man he is not ready to be a manager.
In fairness to him, Chelsea have been a graveyard to managers (and strikers). They have had 7 managers in the last 10 years

But after spending +200m on players you'd think they should be higher up the table.
 

IlCapitano

Senior Member
Dec 16, 2012
2,457
In fairness to him, Chelsea have been a graveyard to managers (and strikers). They have had 7 managers in the last 10 years

But after spending +200m on players you'd think they should be higher up the table.
They are also the most decorated English club in the last 15 or so years.

Abramovich will mostly back managers but demands excellence. Alpha owner.
 

Dru

★ ★ ★
Premium
Aug 8, 2006
64,789
https://theathletic.com/2298431/2021/01/03/lampard-chelsea-sacked-next-manager/

Anyone with the Athletic sub can see if any names are mentioned in the article?
No replacement options mentioned

Frank Lampard’s job at Chelsea under threat, replacement being looked at


Frank Lampard’s job as manager is under serious threat, The Athletic understands.

A humbling fourth defeat in seven matches against a Manchester City side will only intensify the questions about the team’s broader direction under the current management team, and sources have told The Athletic that Chelsea have begun to explore alternative plans with a view to replacing Lampard if the current slump continues, if not sooner.

This is a fluid situation, and as such there is no definitive timeframe for when Lampard might be sacked; it’s possible that he could still see out the season if results improve. But the history of the Roman Abramovich era tells us that once conversations of this nature begin taking place within the corridors of power at Stamford Bridge, managerial change tends to become a question of “When?” rather than “If?”

The 3-1 home defeat by Manchester City leaves Chelsea eighth in the Premier League table and with Southampton below them with a game in hand. Although they are only three points off the top four, the club’s hierarchy are concerned by recent form and the struggles of summer signings Kai Havertz and Timo Werner.

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As recently as one month ago Chelsea were on a 17-match unbeaten run across all competitions, within striking distance of Premier League leaders Liverpool and had qualified for the Champions League knockout stage as winners of Group E with a game to spare. Lampard appeared to have found a promising balance with his shift to a fluid 4-3-3 system and was regularly fielding — and swiftly dismissing — questions from journalists about his team’s title chances.

The subsequent dip in form has been startling. Prior to the City game, Chelsea lost away from home against Everton, Wolves and Arsenal in the Premier League and even their sole victory in the last seven games, a 3-0 home win over West Ham, was far less convincing than the scoreline suggested. In the wake of a limp 3-1 defeat at the Emirates Stadium, Lampard publicly criticised his players and singled out Werner, who was substituted along with Mateo Kovacic at half-time.

Chelsea’s on-pitch struggles have been compounded by worsening issues off it; sources have told The Athletic that tensions between Lampard and a number of individuals in his squad — particularly those who have found themselves outside his group of trusted regular starters — have been growing for some time, and now factor into the board’s assessment of the overall health of the situation at Cobham.

Lampard’s biggest challenge this season was always going to be remoulding his team in a manner that maximised Werner and Havertz, Chelsea’s marquee signing of a spectacular transfer window and arguably the club’s boldest statement of intent in the transfer market since acquiring Eden Hazard from Lille in the summer of 2012. Neither player has produced more than flashes of their best football so far this season.

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After a bright start, Werner’s performances have declined sharply on the left of Lampard’s three-man attack, a significant tactical departure from the withdrawn striker role that helped him flourish under Julian Nagelsmann for RB Leipzig last season. In addition to several gilt-edged misses, he has looked increasingly ill at ease with the attacking and defensive demands of operating as a winger in recent weeks and has now failed to score in his last 12 appearances for Chelsea — his worst scoring drought for more than four years.

Havertz’s struggles since arriving from Bayer Leverkusen have been even more pronounced. Lampard has consistently defended the 21-year-old in public, pointing out last week that he trained with Chelsea for only five days before the start of the Premier League season and has also been hampered by the lingering after-effects of contracting COVID-19, which left him bed-bound for more than a week in November. But it also remains unclear whether he has a natural role in the team’s current 4-3-3 system, and Lampard has deployed him as a No 10, a No 8 and a false nine to varying degrees of success.

Primarily though, Lampard is being judged on results. Defeat against City means Chelsea have three fewer points after the first 17 matches of this Premier League season (26) than they did at the same stage of the 2019-20 campaign (29) — a return that is regarded as unacceptable given the club spent well in excess of £200 million in transfer fees and made vast salary commitments to bring in Havertz, Werner, Ben Chilwell, Hakim Ziyech, Edouard Mendy and Thiago Silva during the shortened off-season.

Lampard has repeatedly cited that quick turnaround as a reason why immediate expectations of this exciting Chelsea squad should be tempered, and there is no doubt that injuries — most notably to Ziyech — have also had a negative impact on recent performances. But his pleas for understanding are not convincing the key decision-makers at Stamford Bridge as they consider the best way to maximise the talent they have assembled.

Replacing a manager mid-season is never ideal, and it would be logical to view Mauricio Pochettino’s decision to take the Paris Saint-Germain job as a positive for Lampard’s job security; the Argentine has long been admired at Stamford Bridge, and would certainly have been regarded as one of the most attractive candidates — particularly given his free agent status — if the position had become available. Chelsea have always backed their judgment in these situations in the past, however, and will not hesitate to act sooner rather than later this time around if they decide a change is required.

Asked about his aspirations for the future last month, Lampard made it clear that he would love to stay at Chelsea beyond the remainder of his current contract, which expires in June 2022. The lack of noise suggesting that he would be offered an extension was notable then, and it is now clear that he would do well just to see out a second full season at the club where he made himself a legend. From Chelsea’s perspective, at least getting rid of him would cost a lot less than some of their previous managers.
 

JuveJay

Very Stable Genius
Moderator
Mar 6, 2007
64,803
I find it funny that whenever Liverpool lose Klopp finds some way to blame the ref. I mean yeah, a certain Man Utd seem to get penalties just for falling over in the box every game, but let's not pretend that Mané or Salah weren't getting them for very little when Liverpool were flying.

I guess being a winner does make you a bad loser, but they need to address the lack of cutting edge up front, because it's putting big pressure on a depleted defence.
 

IlCapitano

Senior Member
Dec 16, 2012
2,457
If City ever get healthy enough they may finally win everything. Pep seems to have found a brain and plays more pragmatic recently, more balanced between possession and counters.
 

DAiDEViL

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2015
49,443
I find it funny that whenever Liverpool lose Klopp finds some way to blame the ref. I mean yeah, a certain Man Utd seem to get penalties just for falling over in the box every game, but let's not pretend that Mané or Salah weren't getting them for very little when Liverpool were flying.

I guess being a winner does make you a bad loser, but they need to address the lack of cutting edge up front, because it's putting big pressure on a depleted defence.
He's always been a bad loser though.
 

Bjerknes

"Top Economist"
Mar 16, 2004
103,416
Funny to think back to all of those EPL pundits saying the Manchowder squad was terrible with no good players. Now they're title contenders with Rashford, Martial, Fernandes, and a re-energized Pogba. Which one is it?
 

JuveJay

Very Stable Genius
Moderator
Mar 6, 2007
64,803
Aston Villa are preparing to field a team of youngsters in Friday's FA Cup third-round tie at home to Liverpool after a "significant" Covid-19 outbreak at the club.

A final decision on whether the game will take place at all will be made on Friday.

Villa manager Dean Smith, his coaching staff and the rest of the club's first-team squad will not be involved after the outbreak forced the closure of the club's Bodymoor Heath training headquarters on Thursday.

The club is in discussions with the Football Association and want to fulfil the fixture (kick-off 19:45 GMT) but final confirmation on whether the tie is played is still on hold pending the results of further testing on the young players who are now being considered for selection.

Mark Delaney, Villa's under-23 coach, is scheduled to take charge in the absence of Smith and his backroom staff. He will be accompanied by a doctor, physiotherapist and kit staff.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/55575321

@Naplessoccer
 

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