General Religion & Philosophy Discussion Thread (7 Viewers)

Kyle

Piemonte Calcio
Contributor
Sep 4, 2006
66,843
My extremely simplistic view on this is that all our choices and decisions are constrained by many external factors.
For example, you can't choose to believe in something, or choose to like or dislike someone, but this is the fundamental requirement of most if not all religions: the unconditional belief, worship and love of a diety or deities.
how about the folks who do going from raised religious to no religion? Happening in mass these days.

But i do agree with your opinion. If i could choose to believe in religion i think it would make my life simpler and add purpose. But I can't choose to believe in something i have never believed in.

I have often heard what to me is such a bizarre argument from religious folks wondering how i can not believe "isn't the world so depressing then".

I don't understand that argument. Wanting to believe is not a reason imo.
 

campionesidd

Senior Member
Mar 16, 2013
6,947
how about the folks who do going from raised religious to no religion? Happening in mass these days.

But i do agree with your opinion. If i could choose to believe in religion i think it would make my life simpler and add purpose. But I can't choose to believe in something i have never believed in.

I have often heard what to me is such a bizarre argument from religious folks wondering how i can not believe "isn't the world so depressing then".

I don't understand that argument. Wanting to believe is not a reason imo.
I think it's mostly due to the internet and the spread of information: it has introduced people to other thoughts and ideas and has taken away the stigma of being an atheist or a non-religious person. Again, these are external factors over which an individual has no control over.
 

ALC

Ohaulick
Oct 28, 2010
41,022
If religion gave you morals, believers wouldn’t commit crimes. Boom, there you go. The link between religion and morals is zero.
 

Kyle

Piemonte Calcio
Contributor
Sep 4, 2006
66,843
I think it's mostly due to the internet and the spread of information: it has introduced people to other thoughts and ideas and has taken away the stigma of being an atheist or a non-religious person. Again, these are external factors over which an individual has no control over.
It isn't that though because most of these completely unreligious folks are evolution of their parents wavering believe in faith and their parents were born decades before the internet.

I think it is marriage of of greater freedom to express doubt with an improvement in quality of life. When you no longer live accepting that 6 of your 12 kids die before they hit puberty (for no reason you can understand) there is a lot less need to rationalize that trauma as part of some grand plan. You can also express those doubts without being socially ostracized.
 

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