Sahar K and Iran (2 Viewers)

ALC

Ohaulick
Oct 28, 2010
41,018
#1
Couldn’t think of a thread to post this so here goes. Just a reminder how lucky most of us are to live in places where that is not an issue, and at least Hoori doesn’t have to deal with that shit anymore either.

 

swag

L'autista
Administrator
Sep 23, 2003
75,180
#4
Changing old culture is hard. The globalization of the world, with media and at an individual level, is putting unique pressures on ideas that many cultures have been traditionally insulated from. This isn't just in Iran of course.

There's going to be a lot of ugly pushback on the way to any eventual progress. Because the rate of change is increasing, and insulation is a losing battle.
 

Mokku

Junior Member
Apr 17, 2019
281
#6
The Imams have a huge influence, they play the religion card to manipulate so many and particularly Muslims who you brainwash easily by taking Quranic text out of context. Very similar to ISIS methods.

People who think outside the Iranian box get punished, if any thought or idea is forced you'll naturally question it leading to 'deviant behaviour'. The Iranians that I know have given up religion because of this but it's actually down to those forcing their skewed ideas as opposed to someone going on a spiritual journey then deciding that they reject the religion.
 
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ALC

ALC

Ohaulick
Oct 28, 2010
41,018
#7
Religion’s nothing but trouble.

It is funny tho that Iran was not anything like this. If you google Iran in the 70s, the place looked like US with everyone wearing stupid disco clothes and showing skin
 

Mokku

Junior Member
Apr 17, 2019
281
#8
Religion’s nothing but trouble.
For some it's salvation, some people couldn't live without it. People who are religious need a deep understanding and sincerity. If you follow text with sincerity but no understanding you get fanatic behaviour and a rigid mindset. If you have a deep understanding but no sincerity you'll get a person abusing their power in the name of religion. This applies all across the board from the US to Russia.
 

Ronn

#TeamPestoFlies
May 3, 2012
9,759
#10
Middle East is a complex mess, people suffering because of government hypocrisy who use religion to abuse their rights.
It's not much about religion anymore. It's a full scale dictatorship with corruption in biblical scale that comes with it. To them any change is bad, since it naturally threatens their position. Women wearing what they want and doing what they like? Unthinkable!
 

campionesidd

Senior Member
Mar 16, 2013
6,945
#11
Changing old culture is hard. The globalization of the world, with media and at an individual level, is putting unique pressures on ideas that many cultures have been traditionally insulated from. This isn't just in Iran of course.

There's going to be a lot of ugly pushback on the way to any eventual progress. Because the rate of change is increasing, and insulation is a losing battle.
Iran was a lot more liberal and open minded before the Islamic revolution.
 

Ronn

#TeamPestoFlies
May 3, 2012
9,759
#13
Is there a push in Iran to revert back to the way things were?
Not strong enough. Government is too brutal for any uprising to have a reasonable chance of success. Prison sentences for activists and protestors are surreal. A woman can get a 10+ sentence just for not wearing hijab and film herself doing it.
 

Mokku

Junior Member
Apr 17, 2019
281
#14
Iran was a lot more liberal and open minded before the Islamic revolution.
They use religion to clamp down on activists example being jail for not covering the hair as Ronn said. Nowhere in religion is it stated that is it fine to jail a woman for not covering her hair but the military and police are strong enforcers of such laws. Again, it's a cover for brutality and dictatorship common to many Arab countries unfortunately.
 
Jul 29, 2017
153
#17
Is there a push in Iran to revert back to the way things were?
Yes, but I don't call it push, its gradual changes.

Women's demand for going to the stadium is a new thing, wasn't exist like 6 7 years ago.
Thanks to social media and the internet in this relatively short period of time, its become one of the most controversial issues in our society.
and remember the demand for going to the stadium is just a pretext to protest for all their basic rights that they don't have

There was a time, after the 1979 Revolution, that women had to strictly cover their heads and wear loose clothing in order not to be sexually appealing in public, nowadays women barley cover their head.
and No, women don't go to jail for not covering their heads, they just get a warning from Moral Polic for breaking the law.
but if they promote not having hijab and make a political issue of it, yes they will definitely go to jail.
 

Ronn

#TeamPestoFlies
May 3, 2012
9,759
#18
Yes, but I don't call it push, its gradual changes.

Women's demand for going to the stadium is a new thing, wasn't exist like 6 7 years ago.
Thanks to social media and the internet in this relatively short period of time, its become one of the most controversial issues in our society.
and remember the demand for going to the stadium is just a pretext to protest for all their basic rights that they don't have

There was a time, after the 1979 Revolution, that women had to strictly cover their heads and wear loose clothing in order not to be sexually appealing in public, nowadays women barley cover their head.
and No, women don't go to jail for not covering their heads, they just get a warning from Moral Polic for breaking the law.
but if they promote not having hijab and make a political issue of it, yes they will definitely go to jail.
Absurd long sentences too.
https://iranwire.com/en/features/6267
 
Jul 29, 2017
153
#19
Yeah absolutely absurd, but as I said before, it's not like they put you in jail because you don't cover your head, they barely care (mullas do, the government doesn't). people post semi-naked photos of themselves in social media and nobody cares.
and what I said before applies to this case that you post too, she was an activist meaning she vocally protested against the hijab and promoted not having hijab, and in this cases consequences are severe, and of course absurd.
 

Ronn

#TeamPestoFlies
May 3, 2012
9,759
#20
Yeah absolutely absurd, but as I said before, it's not like they put you in jail because you don't cover your head, they barely care (mullas do, the government doesn't). people post semi-naked photos of themselves in social media and nobody cares.
and what I said before applies to this case that you post too, she was an activist meaning she vocally protested against the hijab and promoted not having hijab, and in this cases consequences are severe, and of course absurd.
Dude I'm from Iran myself so I know what's allowed and what's not. The fact that government or mullahs enforce the dress code less strictly is totally irrelevant since you cannot consider that a right. The moment women demand it as a right they get thrown in jail.
 

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