LGDS: Roma belongs to the Russians (1 Viewer)

Jan 24, 2004
2,179
#1
source: T-online.de

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Totti geht für die Russen auf Torejagd


Mit der bevorstehenden Übernahme des AS Rom durch den russischen Ölkonzern Nafta hat sich Roman Abramowitsch durch die Hintertür jetzt auch in den italienischen Fußball eingekauft. Dem spendierfreudigen Besitzer des FC Chelsea London gehört ein Fünftel des Moskauer Nafta-Konzerns, der 400 Millionen Euro für den italienischen Meister von 2001 hinblättern und die Mannschaft sofort mit Stars wie Christian Vieri, dem Spanier Joaquin und dem Niederländer Edgar Davids verstärken will. "Rom gehört den Russen", titelte die italienische Sportzeitung "La Gazzetta dello Sport". Nach dem mehrtägigen Verhandlungsmarathon in Rom seien bis zur offiziellen Verkündung nur noch Details zu klären.

100 Millionen Euro für den Besitzer
Über Nacht würde Rom damit vom potenziellen Pleite-Club zum Liga-Krösus aufsteigen. Mit dem frischen Geld aus Moskau können die Römer den erdrückenden Schuldenberg von 250 Millionen Euro auf einen Schlag abtragen und die gefährdete Spiellizenz für die nächste Saison sichern. 50 Millionen Euro will Nafta sofort in Verstärkungen investieren. 100 Millionen Euro kassiert der bisherige Besitzer Franco Sensi. Der 76-jährige Bauunternehmer, der den Club 1993 übernahm, soll Ehrenpräsident werden.


Verhandlungen an der Spanischen Treppe
Sensi musste seine anfängliche Ablehnung gegenüber den Russen angesichts der immer brisanteren Finanznöte des Traditionsclubs aufgeben, denn die Spieler hatten schon monatelang auf ihre Gehälter gewartet. Sensi hatte keine Wahl, räumte auch Club-Direktor Franco Baldini ein, der zusammen mit Dutzenden Anwälten die langwierigen Verhandlungen mit den Russen um Delegationsleiter Waleri Semenenow in einer Kanzlei an der berühmten Spanischen Treppe geführt hatte.


"Der AS Rom den Römern"
"Die Russen haben als einzige ein ernsthaftes Angebot gemacht", betonte Baldini. Noch in der Nacht zum Donnerstag hatte Roms Bürgermeister Walter Veltroni vergeblich versucht, römische Unternehmer zu einem gemeinsamen Kaufangebot zu überreden. "Der AS Rom den Römern", forderte Veltroni, der sich nun mit den neuen "Roma"-Herren abfinden muss.


Wer steckt eigentlich hinter Nafta?
In Nafta hat der Tabellenzweite der Serie A nun ein finanzstarkes Unternehmen im Rücken. Präsident des Konzerns ist Anatoli Kolotilin, ein ehemaliger sowjetischer Vize-Minister für Industrie. Mehrheitsaktionär des Konzerns ist der Staatspräsident Putin nahe stehende Duma-Abgeordnete und Öl-Magnat Suleiman Kerimow. Die Kompetenz im Fußballgeschäft bringt Chelsea-Boss Abramowitsch ein.

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summary:

Russian NAFTA (an oil-company) pays 400 milion euro taking over AS Rom. Money will be used to reduce the debts (250 milion) and to secure licence for comming season. Another 100 milion will get Franco Sensi, the former president who stays "president of honour" (don't know the word, what is it?? :D). NAFTA, which also consist of Chelsea's Abramowitsch (1/5 stake), plans to invest immediately 50 milion euro in new reinforcements (players named: Vieri, Joaquin, Davids).

your thoughts... :)
 

mikhail

Senior Member
Jan 24, 2003
9,575
#2
++ [ originally posted by kurvengeflüster ] ++
Another 100 milion will get Franco Sensi, the former president who stays "president of honour" (don't know the word, what is it?? :D).
Honourary president.


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From The Moscow Times
Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2004. Page 5

Nafta-Moskva in Hunt for Italian Soccer Club

Combined Reports ROME -- Italian soccer club Roma could be the next major team to benefit from the riches of Russian oil tycoons.

Roma president Franco Sensi was quoted on the front pages of Italy's two biggest sports dailies Tuesday as saying he was in talks to sell the club to Russian oil company Nafta-Moskva.

"There are negotiations, but they will go on for a while," Sensi was quoted as saying in Gazzetta dello Sport and Corriere dello Sport.

"If it happens, I'll remain honorary president."

While only five points behind Serie A leader AC Milan, Roma is struggling financially and is said to be 250 million euros ($315 million) in debt.

The club has delayed paying players' salaries for months.

Fans of the club are hoping that a Russian investment could be along the lines of Roman Abramovich's purchase of English Premier League club Chelsea in June and the consequent $160 million spent on buying 13 new players.

Suleiman Kerimov, one of the main shareholders of Nafta, is said to be a friend of Abramovich's.

Reports have suggested that Nafta has offered Roma 400 million euros for control of the club.

Roma issued a statement Tuesday denying that any deal was under way. Rome Mayor Walter Veltroni said earlier this month that he would do his best "to make sure Roma remains for the Romans."

Sensi is in his 10th season as club president. Roma won the 2000-01 Serie A title under his direction.

A person who answered the telephone Tuesday at Nafta-Moskva -- an oil trader that reportedly controls a small stake in state-controlled national pipeline monopoly Transneft -- said the company was unable to comment on the report because it has no press office.

(AP, MT)
 

mikhail

Senior Member
Jan 24, 2003
9,575
#3
[26 Feb 2004]
ROME (AFP)

Financially troubled Roma dismissed media reports they had receieved a firm offer from Russian oil company Nafta Moskva to buy the ailing Serie A club.

Shares in the club were suspended earlier in the day ahead of Roma's statement which was sent to the Milan stock exchange.

The club confirmed representatives of Roma president Franco Sensi, whose family own 63.77 per cent of the club, have been in talks with Nafta Moskva officials, but that no concrete offer has been made.

Full article

Could a mod add the 'a' to "Rom" in the thread name please?
 

KB824

Senior Member
Sep 16, 2003
31,538
#4
I say, Good for them.


Serie A needs as many top quality teams as possible, and Roma would definitely be a long term power if this goes through.


Maybe this will light a fire under Juve's asses to do something this summer.



Where were these people two years ago when Fiorentina was in trouble :down:
 

KB824

Senior Member
Sep 16, 2003
31,538
#7
In what way Erik.


Capitalizing as far as a Corporation taking advantage of an oportunity to purchase a team, or the fact that its a Corporation , not an individual doing the purchasing in the first place.
 

Slagathor

Bedpan racing champion
Jul 25, 2001
22,708
#8
Pooring money into one or two corporations where there are hundreds (football clubs) in a very ill market will seriously damage the balance. Basically it is a reward for the insane financial policies these clubs have worked with! It just weighs a bit heavily in my stomach.
 

KB824

Senior Member
Sep 16, 2003
31,538
#9
Well, until there's a radical change in how these leagues can have more competitive balance (salary cap, revenue sharing), this is the bed that FIFA has made, and now they're stuck.
 

aressandro10

Senior Member
Jul 30, 2003
2,884
#10
i actually appreciate what the Russian is doing to football.. despite the fact that some 'poor' world class players have to earn their million by just waiting on the bench, these Russian pour money back into football...

Chelsea is the only place in Europe where u can hope to sell players above their market price... surely benefit Parma, West Ham, Southamptom, Blackburn , Charlton among others... with the broke of some of major tv corporatioon.. smaller clubs have to depend to selling players as a source to survive.. the transfer window thing really dont help them very much.. but now at least the can hope to sell to Abramovich .if they are lucky..
 

mikhail

Senior Member
Jan 24, 2003
9,575
#11
++ [ originally posted by Andre 3000 ] ++
Well, until there's a radical change in how these leagues can have more competitive balance (salary cap, revenue sharing), this is the bed that FIFA has made, and now they're stuck.
I know they've done some of that in the major sports in the US. Has it worked Serge?
 

KB824

Senior Member
Sep 16, 2003
31,538
#12
Yes, it has worked, and although there are a lot of people who don't like the way that the salary cap is run in certain sports (like myself:D) it is for the betterment of the league and the stability of the franchises that make it worthwhile.

What it also does is it gives many more teams a realistic chance of being able to compete for a championship.


I know that I've explained how it works a couple of times, but I'll give it another go, just for you, John:D


Here's how it works:

Let's take two leagues, the NFL and the NBA, and I'll give you examples as tow why it works.

First, the league that has the salary cap situation dead on, the NBA.


Every team is subject to a cap on player salaries for the coming season, and that cap is determined by taking all the revenue, deducting non-salary expenses, and taking that profit and putting it up against the total player salaries. There is a certain percentage, I'm not sure what, that will determine the salary cap.

So if the percentage threshold is 60 % and the player salaries exceed that amount, then the cap is reduced next year so that it will fall in line.

That very rarely ever happens, ususally, the salary cap will go up every year. This insures that the players are still well paid, but that the owners don't have to use all of their revenue just to pay the players.

What you can do in the NBA however, which I like, is that the salary cap only really becomes a problem if you are trying to sign a player from another team whose contract has just expired. If you have a player, say Kobe Bryant, whose contract will be up at the end of the year, the system guarantees that the current team he plays for (LA LAkers) can pay him more than anyone. What this does is it breeds familiarity in the franchise, and allows that player to be hansomely compensated for staying with the team that originally selected him. Don't get me wrong, a player like Kobe could still make quite a bit of money, but under this current system, he would be able to make 148 million for 7 years with los angeles, while the most he could make with another team is 98 million for 6 years.

There is also what is called a "luxury tax" threshold. What this is, is the average of all the salaries of the teams divided by the number of teams in the league. Let's say the average salary for a team is 50 million dollars, what happens is that every team that is over this threshold must pay the league dollar for dollar the amount that they are over. The money then gets distributed to the teams that are within the threshold guidelines.

Now, any team that is within the threshold guidelines can use what is called low-level and mid-level exemptions (LLE and MLE). These are salary slots that can be used by these teams that will not count against the salary cap. More often than not, you don't really get a superstar player for those exemptions, but this year was different with Karl Malone and Gary Payton coming to LA for those exemptions, at 1.5 and 4.9 million dollars, respectively.





The National Football League is the salary cap situation that I hate, in the fact that it is what's called a "hard" cap, meaning that it is very inflexible, meaning that if the cap is 80 million dollars, then that's what your limit can be, regardless if you are simply trying to retain your own players who are currently out of contract. What happens is that star players simply get released because these teams have to get under the cap by a certain deadline (March 2nd), or they can't participate in any of the off-season activites, such as the signing period and the NFL draft.


The NBA cap allows more flexibility in that it allows you to have the best opportunity to keep your own out-of-contract, or "free agent" players, while the NFl can sometimes be a constant turnover.





Revenue Sharing is a system that is used primarily by Major League Baseball, where a certain percentage of revenue that the most successful teams make will give to the smaller teams so that they can stay afloat. It's not a perfect system, because some of the smaller teams don't necessarily use that money to improve the product on the field, rather they put it in their own pocket. This league also has a luxury tax in place as well, although it is not a dollar for dollar system like the NBA.





One thing though, John, as to why these systems work in the US is that this is all very localized within the US ,and Canada, meaning that nearly all the players are acquired from the US , Canada and the Carribean Islands(for baseball), with the exception of the NHL and NBA with the influx of foreign players. Its not a spending free-for-all where all the rich teams get all of the best players. These players are selected in an amateur draft, and the selection process goes in reverse order of your team's standing for the season. This allows the weaker teams to have an opportunity to select the best available talent, and therefore, in time, having a chance to be a very competitive squad that can realistically compete for a championship. It is a very inexact science, and for every Lebron James that has come along, there have been 10 total busts who have been selected very highly that didn't pan out. You're not allowed to go out and simply "buy" a player from a smaller club, because there is no such thing as a "smaller division" club.

Each player that is drafted will imediately go to the respective squad that selcted him (NBA and NFL), or go to one of their developmental squads (MLB and NHL) for experience and seasoning. It's not the same as Juve loaning out a player to a Ternana or Atalanta, because those teams are their own seperate entity and have no affiliation with Juve at all, whereas these developmental teams here in the US are in direct connection with the parent club, and all the players belong to that parent club.


The reason why I don't think that it would work for football in Europe is the sheer volume of players and teams that you have, and each league having three divisions, it would take weeks or months to get a draft done, and then how would you decide what the selection order would be in the first place. The only way that it would work is if each league had a draft for players in their own country, but then you would have all Italians in Serie A, all Dutchmen in Eredivisie, etc. etc. etc., and that would be a shame.
 

mikhail

Senior Member
Jan 24, 2003
9,575
#13
Thanks Serge. I think that there are huge problems with implimenting those systems in world football, not least that the clubs are individual companies, and the big ones are very influential. Profit-sharing? Over my dead dividend.

The draft is even harder. The top clubs have bettrer training facuilities, better coaches. The best players should have access to those facuilities.

Salary caps as a percentage of turnover is the way to go to begin financial reform - preventing future Fiorentinas, Romas, and Leeds before they can get out of control. Limiting transfer bids might work too. All Abrahmovic's money would be useless then.
 

Layce Erayce

Senior Member
Aug 11, 2002
9,116
#14
++ [ originally posted by mikhail ] ++

A person who answered the telephone Tuesday at Nafta-Moskva -- an oil trader that reportedly controls a small stake in state-controlled national pipeline monopoly Transneft -- said the company was unable to comment on the report because it has no press office.

(AP, MT)

very very suspicious.....
 

KB824

Senior Member
Sep 16, 2003
31,538
#16
++ [ originally posted by mikhail ] ++
Thanks Serge. I think that there are huge problems with implimenting those systems in world football, not least that the clubs are individual companies, and the big ones are very influential. Profit-sharing? Over my dead dividend.

The draft is even harder. The top clubs have bettrer training facuilities, better coaches. The best players should have access to those facuilities.

Salary caps as a percentage of turnover is the way to go to begin financial reform - preventing future Fiorentinas, Romas, and Leeds before they can get out of control. Limiting transfer bids might work too. All Abrahmovic's money would be useless then.


If football was restricted to only within your own borders, then it would work splendidly. That's why it works in the US and parts of Canada. Yes, its restricted to its own borders, but those are HUGE borders, both geographically and financially. The US, as a whole, dedicates a lot of its disposable income to attending sporting events. Consider this: There are 5 major sporting leagues, the NFl has 32 teams, the NBA has 30 teams, Major League Baseball has 30 teams, the National Hockey League has 30 teams, and Major League Soccer has 10. That's 130 major professional sports franchises in the US and Canada, not counting major college athletics, comprising of college football (american) and college basketball, and NASCAR Racing. How all of these sports have managed to thrive and survive is beyond me. As far as a draft is concerned, they, meaning the smaller teams, would HAVE to upgrade their facilities, for they would no longer be just a stopping ground for other teams young talents.

But it would never work. So unless they put a limit on a team's salary, or a fixed amount on transfer fees, it will be the "same old song" for the next several decades.
 

mikhail

Senior Member
Jan 24, 2003
9,575
#17
Reform can be lead by Europe Serge, and any reform there will spread, however slowy. It's one sphere of influence where "Old Europe" still has a huge lead! ;)
 

Layce Erayce

Senior Member
Aug 11, 2002
9,116
#18
++ [ originally posted by mikhail ] ++
:D Isn't it. "Eh, journalists scare us. Please go away. Where's my blankey?"
its not just that. its that a corporation with the capability of purchase a football club does not even have a press office!

and the fact that its from russia....reeks of corruption imho
 

KB824

Senior Member
Sep 16, 2003
31,538
#19
++ [ originally posted by mikhail ] ++
Reform can be lead by Europe Serge, and any reform there will spread, however slowy. It's one sphere of influence where "Old Europe" still has a huge lead! ;)
I'm not saying it couldn't happen, its just that, if put to a vote, you're talking about getting a majority vote from 300 clubs, instead of 32.
 

gray

Senior Member
Moderator
Apr 22, 2003
30,091
#20
I'd rather it happened to Parma. They're not out enemies and at least that way the scudetto race would open up a tad more
 

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