Violence in Spain (1 Viewer)

Jul 12, 2002
5,666
#1
From Soccernet:

Spain in mourning after fan's death
Simon Baskett
MADRID, Oct 8 (Reuters) - A 31-year-old fan of Spanish soccer club Deportivo Coruna died following violent incidents after their King's Cup match against third division side Santiago Compostela on Tuesday.

A spokesperson from the Santiago hospital where the man was taken following the game said that medical workers were unable to resusciate Manuel Rios Suarez and that he was dead on arrival at the hospital's casualty unit.

Local government officer Jose Manuel Perez told Spanish national radio that Rios, a father or two, had been attacked by a member of Deportivo's radical group of fans after he had tried to intervene to prevent an attack on a young boy wearing a Compostela shirt outside the stadium.

Spanish media said that Rios, who had attended the match together with his wife and a friend, collapsed moments after being kicked violently in the side chest by the aggressor, who had apologised for the attack after realising that Rios was a Deportivo fan.

No arrests have yet been made in connection with the incident.

An autopsy was due to be carried out on the victim's body later on Wednesday to determine the precise cause of death.

REFEREE STRUCK

The game, which ended in a 1-0 victory for Deportivo, was marred by a series of violent incidents in and around the stadium which resulted in injuries to both police and spectators.

In a separate incident at another King's Cup match in Castellon, referee Jesus Tellez Sanchez suspended the tie when he was hit on the head by a mobile phone battery thrown from the crowd after he awarded a penalty in favour of visiting side Valencia in the closing minutes of the game.

When questioned about the incidents Spain's Minister of the Interior Angel Acebes expressed the need for renewed action to halt the increase in football-related violence.

'We have to apply the full force of the law to reduce this type of violence to the minimum,' he said.

'Nowhere in the world has managed to end it completely, but we have to take constant measures to reduce it as much as possible and isolate violent conduct in football stadia.'

The Spanish Football League (LFP) said that the rising tide of violence was a social problem rather than one connected with the sport of football.

'Normally the people involved in these incidents are delinquents that go to the matches, not fans,' LFP spokesman Toni Fidalgo told Europapress.

'I would like to send my condolences to the families and we are worried by these events, but we cannot heap the blame for all the violence in society on football.'
 
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Ian
Jul 12, 2002
5,666
#2
Honestly, I don't know how this type of thing continues to happen. I mean, I've been in crowd brawls, I've seen riots and the like, but why can't they stop people from being killed? Why can't they stop people from throwing missiles onto the field? They do it pretty well in America. The American football fans are crazy and they would fight with each other if not for the security presence at games. The last time a spectator died in the US, she was hit by a foul ball. There has to action taken, something has to be done. Maybe the solution is to actively search out and deny entrance to radical supporters groups.

To me, it's even more dispicable that those hooligans wer going to attack a child. Who attacks a child? That's so wrong, I can't even describe it. The man who died, Rios, is a hero.
 

Ivy

Senior Member
Jul 16, 2003
1,604
#4
++ [ originally posted by Rickenbacker2 ] ++
Honestly, I don't know how this type of thing continues to happen. I mean, I've been in crowd brawls, I've seen riots and the like, but why can't they stop people from being killed? Why can't they stop people from throwing missiles onto the field? They do it pretty well in America. The American football fans are crazy and they would fight with each other if not for the security presence at games. The last time a spectator died in the US, she was hit by a foul ball. There has to action taken, something has to be done. Maybe the solution is to actively search out and deny entrance to radical supporters groups.

To me, it's even more dispicable that those hooligans wer going to attack a child. Who attacks a child? That's so wrong, I can't even describe it. The man who died, Jose Manuel Perez, is a hero.
you are right. :down: somehow this must stop.


About the child. Yes, it's so wrong, but i guess childern may just shout out nasty things without thought. And in such a heated atmosphere those hooligans will just attack any person who aggitates them. They are not in control of themselves anymore.

Of course i'm not saying that this makes them any less to be blamed, just my speculationabout what on earth could make such people attack children.

My deepest condolences go out to the kids who have lost their father :frown:
 

Dragon

Senior Member
Apr 24, 2003
27,407
#6
his mother was really sad she came on tv today saying that she found it amazing that her son got killed watching play his favourite team where the atmosphere should be happiness and safe
 

gray

Senior Member
Moderator
Apr 22, 2003
30,089
#8
Indeed... he's truly a hero, defending the child...

Who cares that the guy apologised after he realised it was a Depor fan!? What kind of bastard tries to attack a child, and then attacks a fan of the opposite team for defending him...

Rest In Peace
 
Sep 28, 2002
13,975
#9
++ [ originally posted by gray ] ++
Indeed... he's truly a hero, defending the child...

Who cares that the guy apologised after he realised it was a Depor fan!? What kind of bastard tries to attack a child, and then attacks a fan of the opposite team for defending him...

Rest In Peace
maybe that child wasn't such a child anyway. somehow i doubt that even neonazi football "fans" would attack a kid even of a different colour. they would boo him, insult him. but they wouldn't beat him. maybe it's the same in this case. maybe that kid was in his 20s. maybe that hero was just a guy who thought that if he tells them to stop the violence thay will stop. his death is tragic nonetheless but maybe you are looking at it from a wrong point of view.

i always thought that spanish fans are quite peaceful. i mean i never heard of deadly fights between barca and real fans. not like in scotland, england or turkey. and here you have it. deportivo fan... shame
 

Martin

Senior Member
Dec 31, 2000
56,857
#10
++ [ originally posted by Sunshine ] ++
About the child. Yes, it's so wrong, but i guess childern may just shout out nasty things without thought. And in such a heated atmosphere those hooligans will just attack any person who aggitates them. They are not in control of themselves anymore.
Good point, evidently some kids have very poor role models. Not saying nothing bad would ever happen if they didn't but no doubt in reduced quantities.
 

Ivy

Senior Member
Jul 16, 2003
1,604
#11
++ [ originally posted by Fliakis ] ++


maybe that child wasn't such a child anyway. somehow i doubt that even neonazi football "fans" would attack a kid even of a different colour. they would boo him, insult him. but they wouldn't beat him. maybe it's the same in this case. maybe that kid was in his 20s. maybe that hero was just a guy who thought that if he tells them to stop the violence thay will stop. his death is tragic nonetheless but maybe you are looking at it from a wrong point of view.
Yeah, we don't know all sides of the story. But it depends. Imagine if you were in a packed stadium, full of atmostphere, a dubious decision has just been awarded, everyones all hyped up and some kid from another team < dares not state eg of 'another team'> starts cursing Juve like crazy.... ..... you'd never know what some people would do :down:
 

gray

Senior Member
Moderator
Apr 22, 2003
30,089
#12
++ [ originally posted by Fliakis ] ++

maybe that child wasn't such a child anyway. somehow i doubt that even neonazi football "fans" would attack a kid even of a different colour. they would boo him, insult him. but they wouldn't beat him. maybe it's the same in this case. maybe that kid was in his 20s. maybe that hero was just a guy who thought that if he tells them to stop the violence thay will stop. his death is tragic nonetheless but maybe you are looking at it from a wrong point of view.
I guess I made some assumptions, but either way, this poor guy died doing the right thing (even if it was just asking ppl to stop, which wouldn't happen in many parts of the world these days, people just walk past), and as for the kid, who cares how old he was or what he was doing, something like football shouldn't cause people to get so violent. Maybe I wouldn't know, because I haven't been to a live match in my life, but I can say here and now that I wouldn't go picking on kids... even though I'm a kid myself ;) What I mean is, someone obviously younger and (apparently) defenceless

++ [ originally posted by Sunshine ] ++


Yeah, we don't know all sides of the story. But it depends. Imagine if you were in a packed stadium, full of atmostphere, a dubious decision has just been awarded, everyones all hyped up and some kid from another team < dares not state eg of 'another team'> starts cursing Juve like crazy.... ..... you'd never know what some people would do :down:
I wouldn't get into a fight, especially against someone less equipped to do so than myself :rolleyes:
 

Ivy

Senior Member
Jul 16, 2003
1,604
#13
Obviously i'm not talking about you or the regular guy on the street who had normal rage hormone levels :rolleyes:
 

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