Something about Networking... (1 Viewer)

Sarah_old

Senior Member
Jul 30, 2002
1,766
#1
Okay, networking is an area where I'm not too knowledgable of, so I need some views from experts out there.

I'm currently using a cable modem to go to the Internet. And everytime when I'm no longer using the Internet, my sister will plug out the cable from my LAN socket (or whatever you call it) and plug it in to her laptop. And if I want to use it again, I'll plug out from hers and plug it onto mine again. This has been going on for sometime. And when both of us needed to go online we normally fight as to whom can use it. So I want to have a solution to this. I'm thinking of getting a router (okay, I know I should've paid more attention during networking classes but I didn't, so I have no idea what's the main function of this) Some people suggested that I get a hub (still no idea what that does or how different it is from a router).

So maybe someone could be kind enough to tell me the difference and what I should be going for. And also, would it be better or worse if I get a wireless one.

Thanks in advance.

-S-
 

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Martin

Senior Member
Dec 31, 2000
56,869
#2
Very nice story btw, sort of like a fairy tale in the computer world :D;)

Let's first analyse your situation from what I understand it is... (arrows indicate traffic from the internet to your computer, of course traffic actually goes both ways, just doing it like this for simplcity)

Code:
DSL modem <------- DSL line from ISP [phone line]
     |___> your computer
     |___> your sister's laptop
(Some modems have a built in router, you should check up on this first of all.)

Let's get down to business now. You have various types of networking equipment for different purposes. I'll just do a short run down of the ones in question.

A router - a router is what the name suggests, it routes network traffic according to the address of the network packet. In its most basic application (my house for instance), it's connected to just two networks. This is usually the case for home DSL clients.

Code:
DSL modem/router <------- DSL line from ISP [phone line]
   |
   |       
   V                                                        
home network
     |  |_ > computer A
     |___ > computer B
In this case it routes traffic from one network to the other. My DSL modem has a built in router and firewall. In this case the router routes traffic from one network (the wide area network [WAN] of the ISP) to the other (the local area network [LAN]). In more complicated cases, the router is connected to several networks (ie. internet routers) and routes between several.

A hub/switch - a hub is a device designed to connect several computers in a network. A switch is the same thing, only more efficient. A hub will broadcast a packet from computer a to all nodes, the packet is rejected by all those with an address not matching, accepted only by the intended recipient machine. A switch will instead send the packet only to the right place.

Code:
home network
     |  |_ > computer A
     |___ > computer B
In its most basic application, a hub connects two computers across a network. Each computer has an ip address on the network (not to be confused with internet ip addresses!!).

Note: you need a hub/switch to connect three or more computers. To connect only 2 nodes you can use a cross linked network cable instead but then if you want them both to access the internet, one would have to act as a router for the other.


I don't know how clear an explanation that was but I'll get right to the point now. You have two options.

1. Use one computer as router

Needs:
- a cross linked network cable
- another network ethernet card

What to do:
- get a 2nd network ethernet card for your computer and install it, connect your computer through that socket to your sister's using the cross linked cable

Code:
DSL modem <------- phone line
     |___> your computer
                  |___> your sister's laptop
Pros:
- cost
- simplicity

Cons:
- only 2 computers can be connected this way
- the computer serving as router must be active at all times when the 2nd wants to access the internet

2. Use a hub/switch

Needs:
- a hub or switch (3 or 5 ports will do)
- possibly a router unless your DSL modem has a built in router

What to do:
(in case you bought a router)
- plug the cable from the modem into the router
(otherwise start here)
- plug the cable from the router into the hub/switch uplink port
- connect each computer with a network cable (category 5 utp is most common in Norway) to a vacant port in the hub/switch

Code:
DSL modem/router <------- DSL line from ISP [phone line]
   |
   |       
   V                                                        
router (if not built into modem)
   |
   |       
   V                                                        
hub/switch
     |  |_ > computer A
     |___ > computer B
Assumption:
- the router has a built-in dhcp server (most routers do I think) to assign ip addresses, otherwise you'll have to set them up manually

Pros:
- more computers can be added to network at any time as long as there are ports free in the hub/switch
- network is always up provided hub/switch is on and router/modem is/are also on

Cons:
- complexity
- cost

Oh and going wireless would mean pretty much the same thing (though only possible with option 2), but would be using a wireless access point/router instead of a regular router.
 

Zlatan

Senior Member
Jun 9, 2003
23,040
#5
++ [ originally posted by Alex ] ++
Beat it, buddy, I got an A in networking :p
I was mostly a sleep during computer class. :lazy: Always had an A tho...

So: I had an A in networking too buddy :p ;)
 

Zlatan

Senior Member
Jun 9, 2003
23,040
#7
Well, thats one way to put it... ;)

But thats not neccessarily a bad thing, that are most politicians' qualifications :D
 

Martin

Senior Member
Dec 31, 2000
56,869
#8
Put it this way.. there aren't many university professors who pursue a career in politics. They have more interesting stuff to do to put it that way ;)
 
OP
Sarah_old

Sarah_old

Senior Member
Jul 30, 2002
1,766
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread Starter #10
    Ack! :stress::D

    Thank you for your long and detailed explanation, Martin :) A bit confusing at first, but finally understood after reading it a few times :lol:

    The second option sounds like a better choice, I think. I don't fancy leaving my computer switched on the whole time my sis is on the net.

    Actually I've been doing some reading and searching too in the meantime, and came across an article about this product --> SMC Barricade 4-port 10/100 Mbps Broadband Router (it has lots of good rating, plus it also has built-in print server :D) I've already placed an order for it (pic below)

    Ps: You got an A for networking?:eek::thumb: I had to drop that subject :irritate:

    -S-
     
    OP
    Sarah_old

    Sarah_old

    Senior Member
    Jul 30, 2002
    1,766
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread Starter #12
    ++ [ originally posted by Alex ] ++
    Very nice story btw, sort of like a fairy tale in the computer world :D;)
    :LOL: Sort of, I guess....

    Bet your version of fairy tale would be the penguin living happily ever after? :D
     

    Dragon

    Senior Member
    Apr 24, 2003
    27,407
    #13
    would you like to come to my house and install one of those martin? because we want to connect our computers here but no one in the house knows how to do it
     
    OP
    Sarah_old

    Sarah_old

    Senior Member
    Jul 30, 2002
    1,766
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread Starter #14
    ++ [ originally posted by Alex ] ++
    Sorry if it was complicated, I cannot explain anything right :D

    Yeah that one looks like it could cover all your needs in one. :)
    No worries :) Good job on the explanation :)

    Yeah, I hope it's worth it....That cost me $115 :-\
     

    maxmc

    Junior Member
    Jul 27, 2002
    347
    #15
    alex, u're my man...
    i've got a router and a hub (in a row..)

    it works perfectly, but trying to watch a stream i face a small problem...

    http://wwitv.com/ns.htm
    --> china
    --> cctv-5 (300k)

    when i click the button a window pops-up and real player one starts...

    then an error message appears:
    CONNECTION TO SERVER COULD NOT BE ESTABLISHED.
    YOU MAY BE EXPERIENCING NETWORK PROBLEMS.
    rtsp://61.139.60.82:554/encoder/2003.rm

    i guess the port 554 is the problem....
    i've entered the ip of my router in the browser window and the graphical interface of it appeared...
    in the port forwarding section i entered from port 554 to 554 and the ip of my com 192.168.0.70

    but it's not working and i don't know why...
    normally i'm quite good at networking and have already set up hundreds of networks... (ok, maybe that's a bit exaggerated)..

    plz help me....
    thx
    max
     

    Ali

    Conditioned
    Contributor
    Jul 15, 2002
    15,882
    #18
    Oh shut up :fero: :D :fero:
    He did a brilliant piece. I didn't expect such a detailed response. :eek:
     

    Martin

    Senior Member
    Dec 31, 2000
    56,869
    #19
    ++ [ originally posted by fabiana-juve ] ++
    would you like to come to my house and install one of those martin? because we want to connect our computers here but no one in the house knows how to do it
    Sure, the next time I'm in the neighborhood I'll drop by ;)

    Max, I'll get back to yours.
     

    gray

    Senior Member
    Moderator
    Apr 22, 2003
    30,137
    #20
    ++ [ originally posted by Alex ] ++
    Beat it, buddy, I got an A in networking :p
    Same here :thumb: but u beat me to the thread u bastard :fero:

    2. Use a hub/switch
    - connect each computer with a network cable (category 5 utp is most common in Norway) to a vacant port in the hub/switch
    :LOL: where is cat5 twisted pair not the standard!? :p
     

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