Rio 2016 Olympics (1 Viewer)

Seven

In bocca al lupo, Fabio.
Jun 25, 2003
35,604
For real though, why can't they participate in the normal Olympics?
They can, but they wouldn't win. In the normal Olympics it's a very tactical race, hence the slower times. However the WR and also the PR's of Olympic finalists are still quite a bit faster. If they'd participate in the normal Olympics, they'd make everyone run faster at the beginning, but they would still lose.
 

king Ale

Senior Member
Oct 28, 2004
21,230
Yeah, they probably wouldn't have made the final race at all. While these records are probably these guys' fastest, they are considerably lower than the best records of normal Olympics medalists. Still crazy though, one of the medalists is visually impaired if I'm not wrong :shocked:
 

Ocelot

Midnight Marauder
Jul 13, 2013
18,943
Yeah, they probably wouldn't have made the final race at all. While these records are probably these guys' fastest, they are considerably lower than the best records of normal Olympics medalists. Still crazy though, one of the medalists is visually impaired if I'm not wrong :shocked:
But the first four runners of the Paralympics all beat the winner of the actual Olympics :D

Seven's explanation makes some sort of sense, but I think they'd still be very very competitive at the regular Olympics.
 

Seven

In bocca al lupo, Fabio.
Jun 25, 2003
35,604
But the first four runners of the Paralympics all beat the winner of the actual Olympics :D

Seven's explanation makes some sort of sense, but I think they'd still be very very competitive at the regular Olympics.
One other thing I thought of is that there might be a problem with them clashing with other competitors. Obviously there's no rule saying you need perfect eyesight to compete, but you might be disqualified because you got in the way of other runners.

Whatever the case may be, if they have a chance in the regular Olympics, I'd assume they would compete.
 

JuveJay

起死回生
Moderator
Mar 6, 2007
58,390
"On Sunday, Fouad Baka of Algeria finished a 1500-meter race in just 3 minutes and 49.59 seconds at Maracanã Stadium in Rio de Janeiro.

That’s fast, so fast that if Baka had finished with that time at that exact stadium in August, he would have beat out Matthew Centrowitz Jr. of the U.S. for the Olympic gold medal. Centrowitz Jr. finished the final in 3 minutes and 50 seconds.

Unfortunately for Baka, he wasn’t racing in the Olympics. He was racing in the Paralympics, where not one or two runners finished ahead of him, but three."


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/paralympic-1500m-t13_us_57d6d3a8e4b03d2d459b7e78?

Not the best comparison but it's still VERY impressive.
Not being able to clearly see how fast you are going is obviously an advantage.
 

king Ale

Senior Member
Oct 28, 2004
21,230
But the first four runners of the Paralympics all beat the winner of the actual Olympics :D

Seven's explanation makes some sort of sense, but I think they'd still be very very competitive at the regular Olympics.
But Olympics medalists have much better records, they just don't run at their fastest in the final race. The qualifying record for the final race only is better than the Paralympics medalists' ones. The final race in the normal Olympics is a lot more tactical and slow than the previous rounds. That's why the comparison is a little off.

Needless to say i had no idea about any of these before reading that article :D

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@Ocelot


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Not being able to clearly see how fast you are going is obviously an advantage.
Especially in real life :D
 

Ocelot

Midnight Marauder
Jul 13, 2013
18,943
But Olympics medalists have much better records, they just don't run at their fastest in the final race. The qualifying record for the final race only is better than the Paralympics medalists' ones. The final race in the normal Olympics is a lot more tactical and slow than the previous rounds. That's why the comparison is a little off.

Needless to say i had no idea about any of these before reading that article :D
I see.

But why? :D
 

king Ale

Senior Member
Oct 28, 2004
21,230
I'm not an expert on this at all but since it's all about winning the race by beating the people who participate in it (rather than aiming for a world record), athletes try to strategize in the longer distance runs. So if A runs at his fastest while B starts slowly and then kicks towards the end, B is more likely to win. A knows it and starts slowly too etc. This makes the race highly tactical, which is likely not the case in paralympics (or at least it is to a lesser extent).
 

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