Philosophy (2 Viewers)

Layce Erayce

Senior Member
Aug 11, 2002
9,116
#1
I've started this thread dedicated to philosophy, as opposed to religion. Requesting a mod to sticky it please.

Academically my research interests lie in experimental philosophy, where cognitive science meets philosophy of mind. But I like to think about other areas, especially areas that produce puzzles to our ordinary conceptions of reality.
 

Seven

In bocca al lupo, Fabio.
Jun 25, 2003
35,663
#4
I've started this thread dedicated to philosophy, as opposed to religion. Requesting a mod to sticky it please.

Academically my research interests lie in experimental philosophy, where cognitive science meets philosophy of mind. But I like to think about other areas, especially areas that produce puzzles to our ordinary conceptions of reality.
You have so much to learn.
 
OP
OP

Layce Erayce

Senior Member
Aug 11, 2002
9,116
#5
One puzzle for philosophers is in the area of intentionality, or "aboutness". How can objects in the physical world be intentional?

Intentionality is the property of thoughts and language to refer, or "intend" to something else. For instance, the phrase "current president of the United States" refers, or "intends" to a particular person. Our scientific understanding of the physical world has no room for such intentions; neither atoms and molecules, nor the entities they are composed of, produce this "intending" effect.

So, if our minds reduce to atoms and molecules, how do they produce this effect? How do they point to things external to themselves?

This is the basic gist of the problem of intentionality.
 

Dostoevsky

Tzu
Administrator
May 27, 2007
80,987
#10
Why does life have to have a point?
Otherwise it's meaningless to do anything.

To survive and reproduce to the best of your ability. All other concerns, whether justice, or love, or equality, are illusions.
So future inhabitants would be meaningless as well?

- - - Updated - - -

Clearly not everyone should reproduce only the top genetic specimen, also we are close to the point of reproduction and survival becoming mutually exclusive
Who decides that?
 
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OP

Layce Erayce

Senior Member
Aug 11, 2002
9,116
#14
But then you're forced to appeal to transcendence. Something beyond the purely naturalistic explanation of human beings as a species sculpted by evolutionary forces.
 

GordoDeCentral

Diez
Moderator
Apr 14, 2005
59,734
#15
But then you're forced to appeal to transcendence. Something beyond the purely naturalistic explanation of human beings as a species sculpted by evolutionary forces.
No doubt, i say what distinguishes us as a species is our intellect and sense of humanity, ultimately it is what we do with those 2 that gives a sense to our existence, it is like sharing a ride whose destination is unknown we can either make the best of it and try to enjoy it with others or not
 

Dostoevsky

Tzu
Administrator
May 27, 2007
80,987
#16
No doubt, i say what distinguishes us as a species is our intellect and sense of humanity, ultimately it is what we do with those 2 that gives a sense to our existence, it is like sharing a ride whose destination is unknown we can either make the best of it and try to enjoy it with others or not
But why are people evil then? And, since many are, are (some) people born evil?

Pleasure pain fear hope move you, not some cosmic understanding
You think pleasure and hope are much greater than fear and pain?
 
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OP

Layce Erayce

Senior Member
Aug 11, 2002
9,116
#18
No doubt, i say what distinguishes us as a species is our intellect and sense of humanity, ultimately it is what we do with those 2 that gives a sense to our existence, it is like sharing a ride whose destination is unknown we can either make the best of it and try to enjoy it with others or not
But are we special because we have these features? What makes these particular features unique from, say, a pig's cognitive capacities, or those of a water buffalo?

Maybe there's no special difference between "humanity" and "buffaloanity". Our intellect and rationality might be features unique to our species, but many species have unique features. None of them justify special status.

So to make your position succeed, you have to hold something special, something almost supernatural about the human mind, with its capacity to reason, and exercise free will, and apprehend truth, goodness, and beauty.

I think that's a viable position to take. But scientists don't like it, because it's spooky and metaphysical. Not grounded in the scientific picture of humans as moist robots.
 

Dostoevsky

Tzu
Administrator
May 27, 2007
80,987
#19
The very fact that you admit to evil is a testament to our sense of humanity, without that expectation evil would have no meaning.

Hope and fear imo are 2 sides of the same coin
Maybe. But after everything sounding simply I don't know why are people unhappy.

But are we special because we have these features? What makes these particular features unique from, say, a pig's cognitive capacities, or those of a water buffalo?

Maybe there's no special difference between "humanity" and "buffaloanity". Our intellect and rationality might be features unique to our species, but many species have unique features. None of them justify special status.

So to make your position succeed, you have to hold something special, something almost supernatural about the human mind, with its capacity to reason, and exercise free will, and apprehend truth, goodness, and beauty.

I think that's a viable position to take. But scientists don't like it, because it's spooky and metaphysical. Not grounded in the scientific picture of humans as moist robots.
We are special because of amygdala.
 

Nzoric

Grazie Mirko
Jan 16, 2011
35,027
#20
No doubt, i say what distinguishes us as a species is our intellect and sense of humanity, ultimately it is what we do with those 2 that gives a sense to our existence, it is like sharing a ride whose destination is unknown we can either make the best of it and try to enjoy it with others or not
Sense of humanity?
 

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