Nirvana Rock n' Roll Hall of Fame (1 Viewer)

Jan 16, 2013
19,948
#1

I know i'm some months late but I didn't realize Nirvana made it into the Rock n' Roll hall of Fame until today. I watched the whole thing and admit i cried a little, literally. It was so sad to imagine how Kurt could've been there, not for the trophy but just to be part of that achievement, personally. It could've been him playing there. It's one of those 'what if' sensations i'll take to the grave.

I believe most members here were babies or not even born when he died. I was a teen when Seattle took over the world and cried like a little girl when i saw the sad news. Other older members here will remember how it was a simpler time. How special was having that CD from that band you liked and how hard it was to find it. Most of the time you had no money to buy anything so you had to exchange cassette tapes with friends. We would treasure everything we had.

At that time i'd like to believe we didn't know how big that whole scene was. Kids wearing flannel shirts and ripped up jeans was just the artificial part of it. Nirvana opened the door to the Alternative underground music to the mainstream. They redesigned Pop music. Just like Punk Rock in the late 70's, the bands of the late 80's/early 90's scene talked to the kids in a way that encouraged them to express themselves. It told them they could be somebody no matter who they were.

As Michael Stipe well said, the fags, the fat girls, the goth kids, the nerdy and weirdos or simply the kid who played at his garage suddenly had a place where they belonged. This is something we haven't seen since and probably won't see it again. It was not only a music scene but a cultural revolution and as lover of all arts i feel blessed to have lived through it.

Just thought i'd share my mind about those 3 men who changed the world.
 

swag

L'autista
Administrator
Sep 23, 2003
75,373
#2
Kurt would have probably spat on the whole process, though. What pushed him more towards the suicidal was the experience that the dumbass jocks in high school who tormented him for his odd nerdness suddenly became huge fans of his rebellious music that was partly influenced by his complete hatred for those clowns.

Then to have them induct him into a Rock N Roll Hall of Fame for it? He probably would have shot himself on the spot.

A more tragic case of "should have been there" at an induction recently is probably Adam Yauch.

But I'm an old dude. I saw Nirvana open for the Melvins at SF's Kennel Club back in 1990. I saw bands like Portland's Dharma Bums, whom supposedly is a concert where Kurt and Courtney Love first met. Nirvana was really good. But I would hardly place them above other creative bands of that era. Of course in that era, while much of the world was looking towards Seattle, I was focused on the post-punk scene in San Diego (while living in SF): bands like Drive Like Jehu (one of my all-time favorites, and just today they announced a reunion for the first time in 20 years), Rocket from the Crypt, Three Mile Pilot, etc. ... the whole Casbah scene.

The difference is those bands continued to slave underground while Nirvana blew up -- much to Kurt's dismay, really.

I would almost argue that the legacy of Dave Grohl is under-valued. What he did after the band, and the insane drumming while in it (you just have to see old videos), didn't click with the mass public as much as a shorter peak for Nirvana did. But it's nothing short of impressive in its own right.
 
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CrimsonianKing
Jan 16, 2013
19,948
#4
Kurt would have probably spat on the whole process, though. What pushed him more towards the suicidal was the experience that the dumbass jocks in high school who tormented him for his odd nerdness suddenly became huge fans of his rebellious music that was partly influenced by his complete hatred for those clowns.

Then to have them induct him into a Rock N Roll Hall of Fame for it? He probably would have shot himself on the spot.

A more tragic case of "should have been there" at an induction recently is probably Adam Yauch.

But I'm an old dude. I saw Nirvana open for the Melvins at SF's Kennel Club back in 1990. I saw bands like Portland's Dharma Bums, whom supposedly is a concert where Kurt and Courtney Love first met. Nirvana was really good. But I would hardly place them above other creative bands of that era. Of course in that era, while much of the world was looking towards Seattle, I was focused on the post-punk scene in San Diego (while living in SF): bands like Drive Like Jehu (one of my all-time favorites, and just today they announced a reunion for the first time in 20 years), Rocket from the Crypt, Three Mile Pilot, etc. ... the whole Casbah scene.

The difference is those bands continued to slave underground while Nirvana blew up -- much to Kurt's dismay, really.

I would almost argue that the legacy of Dave Grohl is under-valued. What he did after the band, and the insane drumming while in it (you just have to see old videos), didn't click with the mass public as much as a shorter peak for Nirvana did. But it's nothing short of impressive in its own right.
Good point. A 20 some years old Kurt would, definitely. As he said it countless times on interviews. In Utero was a way of trying to get back into the raw sound they had before Nevermind. He hated all they had become. But as Kurt's mom said, deep inside, an-almost 50 year old Kurt would have looked at it in a different way and appreciate it.

I envy you. I so wish i had seen them. The only chance i've had of seeing them was in 93' at Hollywood Rock in Rio. My friend went, i didn't make it. Almost killed myself. I Saw Mudhoney then in 97', Sonic Youth in 99'... but the vibe was just different then.

I'm not familiar with that scene nor any or those bands and i'm consider myself a somewhat encyclopedia when it comes to rock. I guess it was a local thing, and as you said the world was busy with Seattle and then London and Britpop. Around that time i was always looking for more obscure stuff from scene like Tad, Jesus Lizard, Love Battery, 7 Year bitch, The Fluid, etc... Remember, i was in Brazil then and finding anything from those bands was ridicuously hard. I remember i paid 120 bucks for a Sonic Youth CD, and i mean dollars :D That was SOME money for a cd then.

Speaking of which, Nirvana was lucky they had Sonic Youth on their side. IIRC Moore was the guy who insisted on his manager go see Nirvana live. The rest is history.

The difference is, what Nirvana did was merge Husker Du, Pixies, Sonic Youth and every weird shit that influenced Kurt and give it a sound that could please the general listener. Of course Butch Vig had something to do with that as well. They were at the right place at the right time.
 

Stevie

..........
Mar 30, 2003
13,327
#5
Massive Nirvana fan thanks for sharing. I grew up listening to the like of Nirvana, Pearl Jam and The Doors thanks to my mother having great taste in music.
 

swag

L'autista
Administrator
Sep 23, 2003
75,373
#7
Tad, Jesus Lizard, Love Battery, 7 Year bitch, The Fluid, etc...
All bands I am well familiar with. :D

The difference is, what Nirvana did was merge Husker Du, Pixies, Sonic Youth and every weird shit that influenced Kurt and give it a sound that could please the general listener. Of course Butch Vig had something to do with that as well. They were at the right place at the right time.
Or also when everybody signed up Steve Albini after he produced Surfer Rosa (PJ Harvey, Superchunk, etc.)

Hey, speaking of Tad, The Jesus Lizard, etc...
 
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CrimsonianKing
Jan 16, 2013
19,948
#8
All bands I am well familiar with. :D



Or also when everybody signed up Steve Albini after he produced Surfer Rosa (PJ Harvey, Superchunk, etc.)

Hey, speaking of Tad, The Jesus Lizard, etc...
:D someone knows his stuff. It's really strange to find someone who still remembers those forgotten bands. I really wish i'd have come to the US earlier.

True, Albini was the go-to guy in the alternative scene but it's fair to say Endino was the guy who put it all together, who made it happen. In fact, you probably remember this gem. Back in 92' i'd kill someone for this.

 

swag

L'autista
Administrator
Sep 23, 2003
75,373
#9
:D someone knows his stuff. It's really strange to find someone who still remembers those forgotten bands. I really wish i'd have come to the US earlier.

True, Albini was the go-to guy in the alternative scene but it's fair to say Endino was the guy who put it all together, who made it happen. In fact, you probably remember this gem. Back in 92' i'd kill someone for this.

:heart: I don't own that album, but I have a recording made off of it from a friend who had it. :p
 

JuveJay

起死回生
Moderator
Mar 6, 2007
59,998
#10
Kurt would have probably spat on the whole process, though. What pushed him more towards the suicidal was the experience that the dumbass jocks in high school who tormented him for his odd nerdness suddenly became huge fans of his rebellious music that was partly influenced by his complete hatred for those clowns.
In a nutshell :tup:
 

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