'Murica! (25 Viewers)

Seven

In bocca al lupo, Fabio.
Jun 25, 2003
35,958
I don't like Bill Gates either. Regardless of whether folks like him and George Soros do what they do to "help the world," it's really hard to trust their intentions.

I will never believe the intentions of Bill Gates are good.

But does it honestly matter at this point?

I mean, unless his masterscheme involves slaughtering 15 million people, he'll have done more good than harm.
 

campionesidd

Senior Member
Mar 16, 2013
10,688
Democrats should try everything to abolish the electoral college, these freaks lost popular vote by 6 mil (still climbing), and they are still crying 24/7.This election should be considered an historic landslide, but because of an insanely stupid system only a 100k difference in few places is what matters.Corn fields have a bigger say than millions of people.
Once Texas turns blue, and believe me, it will, Republicans will be the ones calling for electoral college reform.
 

il brutto

Senior Member
Jun 6, 2015
9,216
California should also have more electoral votes, about 65 total. When you compare weighted population against Wyoming, for example, it's one elector per 700,000 people versus one per 200,000 people. But the Republicans would have a significant 'handicap' going into any future elections if this happened.
Republicans would be handicapped by fair elections? Trump disagrees.
 

Cerval

Senior Member
Premium
Feb 20, 2016
21,391
The republicans are apparently saving 75% of the donations they're getting and the rest is used for legal battles.

Donald getting ready for 2024
 

swag

L'autista
Administrator
Sep 23, 2003
76,656
  • swag

    swag

I don't like Bill Gates either. Regardless of whether folks like him and George Soros do what they do to "help the world," it's really hard to trust their intentions. This falls in line with the "power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely" premise. Someone like Soros made a living shorting currencies and destroying the purchasing of millions of people for his personal gain and agenda, yet he and others are supposedly champions of the world, or doing "god's work" as Lloyd Blankfein once said. I think not.
I kind of believe they think they are being benevolent dictators with their money. But again I think it's a little Trumpian that it's about their ego, it's how they refuse to let go of their relevance to the world, and they are likely filled with enough hubris to create all sorts of damage and havoc in an unchecked environment.

It's basically Pablo Escobar with the local poor -- just without the murderous drug trade side.

The problem with politics is it's a lucrative reality TV show where the worst rise to the top and fans fuel the flames with their obsessive nature over people who they think care about them. A recipe for disaster.
Pretty much. The narcissism is strong in most, and people feed them that.

I will never believe the intentions of Bill Gates are good.

But does it honestly matter at this point?

I mean, unless his masterscheme involves slaughtering 15 million people, he'll have done more good than harm.
I don't see it that way myself. Much like Pablo Escobar, what passes as personal philanthropy can often be a desire for power and influence -- and ideally one that's extrajudicial with no checks or balances. And that philanthropy serves the power interests as well.

It's much like a pharma company that has more interest in keeping people sick and paying for their medications rather than curing them and losing customers. Philanthropy is a way to keep the systems in place that they have mastered for their own personal power and advantages. And it serves as a defense or a foil to potential threats or even just public sentiment to question those very abused systems of power that made them successful in the first place.

Yes, I am comparing the philanthropy of Bill Gates and George Soros to Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy at a societal level.
 

swag

L'autista
Administrator
Sep 23, 2003
76,656
  • swag

    swag

So the Deep State is even deeper than Trump thought?

Rich people being criticized for being benevolent :baus:

Plebs are hard to please it seems.
Cake is good. Who doesn't like cake? Let them eat it.

A nice pat on the head and a quarter in the pocket will do well to keep the system of power in place and the torches and pitchforks at bay.

Let us celebrate the head-pats and quarters and call them holy men.
 
Dec 22, 2018
992
May 6, 2012
4,215
I don't like Bill Gates either. Regardless of whether folks like him and George Soros do what they do to "help the world," it's really hard to trust their intentions. This falls in line with the "power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely" premise. Someone like Soros made a living shorting currencies and destroying the purchasing of millions of people for his personal gain and agenda, yet he and others are supposedly champions of the world, or doing "god's work" as Lloyd Blankfein once said. I think not.



Climate change would have to occur at a drastic rate for that to happen. Maybe the elite will be sleep through the massive tsunamis that hit their Malibu and Hamptons mansions?




I would call Gavin Newsom the typical politician at the state and national level. Common traits of this person would be: enjoys the power, looks to increase wealth through public service, consumed with himself, wants to achieve re-election for continuation, et cetera. The problem with politics is it's a lucrative reality TV show where the worst rise to the top and fans fuel the flames with their obsessive nature over people who they think care about them. A recipe for disaster.

At this point, I would take Roland Schitt from Schitt$ Creek over pretty much any professional politician in DC.
Soros was able to make money because he correctly predicted that a terrible government policy would fail. This led to the adoption of inflation targeting which has improved the British economy.
 

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