Let's kick racism out of football (1 Viewer)

JCK

Biased
May 11, 2004
113,932
#1
With Spain in complete control, and multiple substitutions that adversely affect the rhythm of all friendlies these days, sections of the crowd began to show one or two disturbing signs.

Every time Ashley Cole or, in particular, substitute Shaun Wright-Phillips recieved the ball, a chorus of jeers went up.

The majority of the crowd within the stadium and television viewers must have been appalled by the racist taunts, and an embarassed silence began to reign over the stadium, which only served to highlight the disgraceful minority.

The match gradually fizzled out, with England unable to produce a shot on target that I can recall, but Spain's technically impressive victory (Xavi was particularly masterful) will be forgotten amid all the cries of controversy.
From Eurosport.com

Spanish foreign ministry condemns abuse

"If there were racist chants then that is deplorable and lamentable and it is not suitable behaviour for football fans," a spokesman for the foreign ministry said on Thursday.

"I am certain that it was only a small element of the crowd and Spain strongly rejects such behaviour."

The game at Real Madrid's Bernabeu stadium was marred by continual monkey noises directed at visiting black players and by a regular chorus of "If you are not f**king black jump up and down" sung by large sections of the 55,000 crowd.

British Prime Minister Tony Blair said he was "very disappointed" by the chants and Minister for Europe Dennis MacShane telephoned his Spanish counterpart on Thursday to tell him of the "outrage across Britain".

The English FA had already complained that racist chanting marred Tuesday's under-21 friendly between the two countries and will contact world body FIFA after Wednesday's scenes.
Aslo from eurosport
 
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JCK

JCK

Biased
May 11, 2004
113,932
#2
With Fifa and Uefa set to launch an inquiry into the Spanish FA after black England players were subjected to loud, persistent and disgraceful racist abuse in Wednesday's so-called friendly, British Minister for Sport, Richard Caborn, has expressed his anger at the antics of the Spanish fans concerned.
Shaun Wright-Phillips and Ashley Cole in particular had to endure monkey chants in the ill-tempered match in Madrid which Spain won, 1-0.

Caborn said: "I will write to my Spanish counterpart to express my outrage. I would like the Spanish FA to condemn the scenes.

"I also expect Fifa and Uefa to fully investigate the issue."

Caborn added: "There is no place for racism in football or modern society, and I strongly believe that action needs to be taken at the highest level."

England coach Sven-Goran Eriksson said: "It’s very bad to hear when people boo players because of the colour of their skin.

"At Lazio four years ago we had some fans who did the same. When things like this happen, then something must be done."

Piara Powar, spokesman for British football’s anti-racist organisation Kick It Out, said: "Uefa needs to threaten the Spanish with closure of stadia, with a ban."

Gordon Taylor, chief executive of players’ union the Professional Footballers’ Association in England, said Eriksson’s team should have been told to make a stand against racist behaviour by walking off during the game.

"The message should have come down from the FA directors, to say we will take responsibility for this and take them off," said Taylor.

The English FA had already complained to Uefa after several England U-21 players were targeted with racist abuse during their game on Tuesday. The FA will now be highlighting the incidents during the senior game.

Captain David Beckham, who plays at the Bernabeu for Real Madrid, admitted the chanting had surprised him.
"Playing here and living here, I’ve never heard anything towards racism at all," said Beckham.

"I was surprised but it’s something the FA and world football are trying to cut out and they are working very hard."

The behaviour of the Spanish fans follows the remarks made by Spain coach Luis Aragones last month about Thierry Henry, ahead of Spain’s game with France.

Aragones claimed he was trying to motivate Henry’s Arsenal team-mate Jose Reyes in training when he made a racist slur against the Frenchman that was captured on TV.

Aragones has not personally apologised to Henry, and refused to comment on Wednesday’s incidents.
From Goal.com
 
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JCK

JCK

Biased
May 11, 2004
113,932
#3
PFA chief Gordon Taylor believes England's players should have walked off the pitch during last night's friendly defeat away to Spain following the racist chanting from the home fans.

Ashley Cole and Shaun Wright-Phillips in particular were subjected to disgusting abuse from a significant section of the Spanish crowd during the 1-0 defeat in Madrid.

Taylor feels it would have been appropriate for the players to walk off the pitch in order to set an example.

He said: "My members were being humiliated.

"The message should have come from the FA directors to say we will take responsibility and take them off."

He added: "We have to say ’enough is enough’ and set an example. It’s about human dignity.

"We should have set an example in that the game is more important than winning or losing."
From goal.com
 

gray

Senior Member
Moderator
Apr 22, 2003
30,096
#8
Jenas's wise words ring out louder than the bigots' boos
Richard Williams
Friday November 19, 2004
The Guardian

A wry little smile crossed the face of Jermaine Jenas as he looked down the row of microphones and notebooks in a corridor under the Bernabéu late on Wednesday night and saw the silver-haired Luis Aragonés giving his version of the night's events to a Spanish television reporter.

An hour earlier, Jenas had been one of the black England players subjected to abuse by a Madrid crowd seemingly intent on demonstrating their support for Aragonés. It seemed a pity that instead of doing the talking, Spain's 67-year-old head coach was not listening to the young England midfield player, not far off 50 years his junior but at least half a century more advanced in his social attitudes.

"It doesn't help," Jenas replied when asked about the Spanish association's failure to apologise or to discipline Aragonés for having referred to Thierry Henry as "that black piece of shit" during a training session last month, an indiscretion caught by a television camera. "It's pretty disgraceful, to be honest with you, that someone at such a high level can make such comments without any backlash."

In a quiet voice, and showing a maturity not just beyond his 21 years but beyond some of his older and younger team mates, Jenas spoke of his anger and disappointment at how the night had been ruined. "The thing that really upsets me is that we came to play a game in a great stadium and all we've got to talk about is the ignorance of racists. We'd been thinking: 'It's Spain, good opposition, great game, it'll keep us on our toes for the World Cup qualifiers.' And we've had to put up with this.

"I wasn't expecting it and I was very surprised. I didn't realise these people were like that. It's happened before, when I've been playing with Newcastle in Europe, but this was probably the worst I've come across. Something's got to be done or, at the end of the day, you're not going to be able to kick racism not just out of football but out of the world completely."

Prompted by the concern over Aragonés's use of a racial slur in an attempt to motivate José Antonio Reyes during national team training at the beginning of October, England trained in T-shirts reading: "Let's Kick Racism Out Of Football" while the Football Association insisted that the two teams lined up for the national anthems behind boards displaying a similar slogan. Jenas said: "Obviously we've got to keep the campaigns going."

Wednesday's monkey noises had started early on, albeit in the relatively subdued fashion that had disfigured the previous night's Under-21 fixture, but as the temperature of the match rose, so did the volume. Yet Jenas was not thinking about that when, after 59 minutes, he was called to replace the subdued Frank Lampard.

"I was just desperate to get out there and play," said Jenas. "I wanted to get out there on the biggest stage and be playing for England. That was the bottom line and it was only thing going on in my mind at the time."

Of the five black players who appeared in England's all-white strip on Wednesday, Jenas was the only one willing to talk about the experience before the team boarded their coach and left the stadium. The rest, it seemed, were too incoherent with anger to be presented to the media.

Shaun Wright-Phillips, the least experienced of the group, suffered the worst, and it was interesting to speculate on the cause. He is, to put it bluntly, the blackest of the five in terms of pigmentation. That made him the easiest target. The paler-hued Jenas and Rio Ferdinand, by contrast, had much less to endure, which said something about the perceptions of those doing the abusing. The Bernabéu Stadium is the ancestral home of Real Madrid. Besides winning the European Cup so many times that their name is virtually synonymous with it, they are also remembered as the club most closely identified with General Franco and the fascist era. In the response of their fans to England's black players on Wednesday, it was tempting to perceive a symptom of that heritage.

In recent seasons, whether by accident or design, Real have purged their ranks of the black players who have made a significant contribution to the cause. Geremi, the versatile Cameroon international, and the tactically astute Claude Makelele of France were moved on. The gifted Samuel Eto'o, also from Cameroon, was allowed out on loan and plays against Madrid tomorrow for Barcelona.

Whatever the crowd's motive, Spanish football brought shame upon itself on Wednesday, and for the authorities to blame "a small minority" compounds the disgrace. Now Fifa must impose the severest sanction available, including a ban on internationals at the Bernabéu for at least a year. Anything less would betray players who have a right to expect protection from bigots.

"Let's hope it doesn't just get pushed under the carpet," the composed and sensible Jenas concluded.

"All we can do is to keep making a stand."

Shame and blame in Spain

There is no room whatsoever for racism or discrimination in our sport. Football is a tool for building bridges and nurturing tolerance. The world is already too full of conflict that has its roots in racism and discrimination."

Sepp Blatter, Fifa president

Our players are strong enough to deal with it - they are strong personalities and strong characters. They know what it takes to handle it but of course they shouldn't have to.

David Beckham

It was very ignorant and wrong. It was disgraceful. Ashley is very upset. That was the worst I have ever experienced.

Jermaine Jenas

If it was England we would probably be kicked out of a competition

Gary Neville

Even the little kids were doing it. It was going around the whole stadium. I don't know what's going on with Spanish football at the moment buy they certainly need to put a plug in it.

Carlton Cole, England under-21 striker

My members were being humiliated. The message should have come down from the FA directors to take them off the pitch.

Gordon Taylor, chief executive of the Professional Footballers' Association

Football as a whole should stand up and express its disgust at what has gone on.

Adrian Bevington, the FA's head of media

We're very disappointed at what happened. Racism has no part to play in sport or anywhere else for that matter. We feel we have made real progress in kicking racism out of football.

Tony Blair's official spokesman

I will write to my Spanish counterpart to express my outrage. I would like the Spanish FA to condemn the scenes.

Richard Caborn, sports minister

Spain condemns any racist manifestations in any public place. We will seriously study what can be done especially regarding the teaching of social values in schools.

María Jesus San Segundo, Spain's sports minister

Racism is endemic in our football to a degree considered unacceptable in other countries. The manager represents Spanish football and should maintain an exemplary attitude towards issues such as xenophobia and violence. Since Aragonés does not appear to understand his responsibilities, he should step down. So should directors who just say: "That's football" - because that is not how it should be.

Editorial in El Periódico

The English FA has done well to protest to Uefa and Fifa. As usual the Spanish FA's reply has been disappointing. If Aragonés is not taken in hand we will have more damaging conflicts. This has damaged the image of Spanish football.

Santiago Segurola, columnist in El País

Racism is a cancer that has touched every aspect of our football and is evident every week all over the country.

Carlos Ferreyra Núnez, co-ordinator of Spain's United Against Racism group

My conscience is clear. I'm only interested in football and in this victory.

Spain's manager Luis Aragonés

The FA is fussing over nothing. If you want bad behaviour, look at those England fans who arrived totally drunk. Are we thus going to say all England fans are drunks?

Miguel Angel Méndez, columnist in Marca

If you are not fucking black jump up and down

Sections of the 48,000 crowd
 

Layce Erayce

Senior Member
Aug 11, 2002
9,116
#9
Spain should be kicked out of the competition, plain and simple. This would do two things:

1. It would set an example for other FAs to respond more firmly and fans to think twice.
2. It would serve to discipline the Spanish FA for refusing to take action against not just Aragones, but against racism in Spanish football in general.

While I'm not advocating the disqualification of teams based on minor racist incidents, the attitude of Aragones and the Spanish Football Association towards this behavior, by being as weak, is irresponsible.

Its about time the Spaniards take racism as seriously as the others do and their disqualification while severe, will be a short-term and will go a long way in convincing them of this truth.
 
Jul 19, 2003
3,286
#10
++ [ originally posted by DukeVonEggwaffle? ] ++
Spain should be kicked out of the competition, plain and simple. This would do two things:

1. It would set an example for other FAs to respond more firmly and fans to think twice.
2. It would serve to discipline the Spanish FA for refusing to take action against not just Aragones, but against racism in Spanish football in general.

While I'm not advocating the disqualification of teams based on minor racist incidents, the attitude of Aragones and the Spanish Football Association towards this behavior, by being as weak, is irresponsible.
I'm with you.

That bigotted idiot should be fired AND fined. The disgusting thing is that he still doesn't think it's a big deal and he's making up silly excuses. Does he actually think anyone's buying that garbage......his conscience is clear....what a wanker.
 

gray

Senior Member
Moderator
Apr 22, 2003
30,096
#11
One thing that really disappoints me is that (correct me if I'm wrong) it doesn't seem like any of the Spanish players have spoken out and condemned the fans' behaviour. IMO it would send out a much stronger message than anything the Spanish FA or English players have to say
 
Jul 19, 2003
3,286
#12
Especially Reyes.........whom the comments about Henry were made to. Instead, he tried to calm things down saying that's his way of coaching :)rolleyes:) and you could see him laughing in the footage when Aragones says it.
 

la_dynamite86

Junior Member
Sep 24, 2004
187
#13
Yeah, the case with Reyes really made me furious when I saw it an TV...Instead of complaining only about terrace-racism (which is nearly impossible to combat...you can only reduce it), they should also concentrate on racism on the field. Such comments as the comment by Aragonés to "encourage" Reyes are really unacceptable.
 

Ali

Conditioned
Contributor
Jul 15, 2002
15,585
#14
It was indeed a sad day for football. The attitude in Spain makes it even worse! How can a coach abuse his players club mate in order to encourage him? :rolleyes: It is truly shameful! And why should it matter if it is half or a quarter of the stadium? Does it make it excusable that it was done by a 'few bad elements'?
FIFA should act and swiftly else all the effort & campaign against rascism will be in vain.
 
Sep 28, 2002
13,975
#15
spain cant just be banned. its not the only the only country where things like that are happening. why isnt anyone asking for lazio's expulsion from serie a? there will be a fine, a ban for game or two, but not for a whole year, because there are loads of countries like that. even in lithuania, when we played israel, there were chants "juden raus!". we were fined, thats it. lengthy ban wont eliminate this problem, its not fifa or uefa, tis spanish federation and stadium representatives who should deal with it.
 
Sep 28, 2002
13,975
#17
++ [ originally posted by DukeVonEggwaffle? ] ++
fli the spanish federation didnt deal with it and thats the problem
well lithuanian ff isnt dealing with it very well too. majority of hardcore fans are skinheads. quite easy to ban them from stadium, isnt it?

fig. 1. skinhead:


fig. 2. regular football fan:



problem solved. at least partly.
 

Layce Erayce

Senior Member
Aug 11, 2002
9,116
#19
++ [ originally posted by Fliakis ] ++


well lithuanian ff isnt dealing with it very well too. majority of hardcore fans are skinheads. quite easy to ban them from stadium, isnt it?

fig. 1. skinhead:


fig. 2. regular football fan:



problem solved. at least partly.
I wouldnt be too worried about Lithuania right now. I have higher expectations of the Spaniards because a lot more eyes are on them not only in the world of football but in other ways as well- they are a major European nation, and they are a major cultural influence and attraction.

The same cannot be said of Lithuania- at least not right now.
 

Torkel

f(s+1)=3((s +1)-1=3s
Jul 12, 2002
3,537
#20
++ [ originally posted by DukeVonEggwaffle? ] ++
I wouldnt be too worried about Lithuania right now. I have higher expectations of the Spaniards because a lot more eyes are on them not only in the world of football but in other ways as well- they are a major European nation, and they are a major cultural influence and attraction.

The same cannot be said of Lithuania- at least not right now.
I don't quite get that logic...(?) Countries who aren't major cultural influences are more likely to have lots of racists?
 

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