Kasparov still strong (1 Viewer)

Martin

Senior Member
Dec 31, 2000
56,836
#1
Kasparov Trounces Computer Foe

Reuters Page 1 of 1

05:40 PM Nov. 16, 2003 PT

NEW YORK -- Chess great Garry Kasparov on Sunday virtually shut down computer program X3D Fritz to score a vital win in the third game of his latest man vs. machine match.

World No. 1 Kasparov, 40, had a winning position with the white pieces after only 16 moves and coasted until the computer's programmers resigned on its 45th turn after more than four hours of play.

In the early stages, Kasparov seized a black pawn and built a wall of pawns that restricted his opponent to ineffective moves that were ridiculed as "silly" by chess experts at the New York Athletic Club venue.

The grandmaster's victory was what he needed to stay in contention in the four-game match. The first game was drawn Nov. 11 and the computer won the second game on Thursday after Kasparov blundered.

The match was tied at one and a half points each. One point is given for a win and a half point for draws. The fourth and final game was scheduled for Tuesday with the winner to collect $200,000.

"Many of black's (X3D Fritz) moves have been very strange," grandmaster Joel Lautier of France said in commentary on the Web site www.x3dchess.com. "It's amazing how computers can play so strongly sometimes and then produce silly moves like today."

German-built Fritz plays as well as a strong grandmaster, but chess programs generally do not perform well in closed positions because they cannot calculate ahead as clearly as they can in open, tactical battles.

X3D Fritz is a combination of Fritz software that is sold commercially and the New York-based X3D Technologies company's virtual reality software.

Kasparov is playing without physically moving pieces on a board. The Azerbaijan-born grandmaster sits in front of a monitor wearing black 3-D glasses that make the image of the board appear to float in front of him. He announces his moves into a voice-recognition program.

The contest is the latest in Kasparov's quest to outsmart computers at the ancient game. He defeated IBM supercomputer Deep Blue in 1996, lost famously to an improved Deep Blue in 1997 and in Feb. 2003, tied with Israeli-built world chess computer champion Deep Junior.

http://www.wired.com/news/culture/0,1284,61258,00.html

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Talk about raw brain power :D
 

gray

Senior Member
Moderator
Apr 22, 2003
30,077
#2
Ahhh i was gonna ask why the heck it says 'still strong', because the last update i got, he lost the last 2 games.
 

mikhail

Senior Member
Jan 24, 2003
9,569
#6
He's a brilliant player - probably the best player of all time, ahead of Fischer, though that's a matter of heated debate. The computers are bloody close to the top now, and only a handful of the very best can hold their own against them.

The real pity is that he should be playing a World Championship semi-final now, but that little SOB holding the FIDE title is holding out.
 

mikhail

Senior Member
Jan 24, 2003
9,569
#7
Match finished 2-2 (+1 =2 -1)
Reports on http://x3dchess.com/
The game scores for anyone who can read them:

[Event "X3D Match"]
[Site "New York USA"]
[Date "2003.11.11"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Kasparov,G"]
[Black "X3D FRITZ"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[WhiteElo "2830"]
[EventDate "2003.11.11"]
[ECO "D45"]

1. Nf3 d5 2. c4 c6 3. d4 Nf6 4. Nc3 e6 5. e3 Nbd7 6. Qc2 Bd6 7. g4 Bb4 8. Bd2 Qe7 9. Rg1 Bxc3 10. Bxc3 Ne4 11. O-O-O Qf6 12. Be2 Nxf2 13. Rdf1 Ne4 14. Bb4 c5 15. cxd5 exd5 16. dxc5 Qe7 17. Nd4 O-O 18. Nf5 Qe5 19. c6 bxc6 20. Bxf8 Kxf8 21. Ng3 Ndc5 22. Nxe4 Nxe4 23. Bd3 Be6 24. Bxe4 dxe4 25. Rf4 Bd5 26. Qc5+ Kg8 27. Rgf1 Rb8 28. R1f2 Qc7 29. Rc2 Qd7 30. h4 Qd8 31. g5 Bxa2 32. Rxe4 Qd3 33. Rd4 Qxe3+ 34. Rcd2 Qe1+ 35. Rd1 Qe3+ 36. R1d2 Qg1+ 37. Rd1 1/2-1/2

[Event "X3D Match"]
[Site "New York USA"]
[Date "2003.11.13"]
[Round "2"]
[White "X3D FRITZ"]
[Black "Kasparov,G"]
[Result "1-0"]
[BlackElo "2830"]
[EventDate "2003.11.11"]
[ECO "C66"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. d3 d6 5. c3 g6 6. O-O Bg7 7. Nbd2 O-O 8. Re1 Re8 9. d4 Bd7 10. d5 Ne7 11. Bxd7 Nxd7 12. a4 h6 13. a5 a6 14. b4 f5 15. c4 Nf6 16. Bb2 Qd7 17. Rb1 g5 18. exf5 Qxf5 19. Nf1 Qh7 20. N3d2 Nf5 21. Ne4 Nxe4 22. Rxe4 h5 23. Qd3 Rf8 24. Rbe1 Rf7 25. R1e2 g4 26. Qb3 Raf8 27. c5 Qg6 28. cxd6 cxd6 29. b5 axb5 30. Qxb5 Bh6 31. Qb6 Kh7 32. Qb4 Rg7 33. Rxe5 dxe5 34. Qxf8 Nd4 35. Bxd4 exd4 36. Re8 Rg8 37. Qe7+ Rg7 38. Qd8 Rg8 39. Qd7+ 1-0

[Event "X3D Match"]
[Site "New York USA"]
[Date "2003.11.16"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Kasparov,G"]
[Black "X3D FRITZ"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2830"]
[EventDate "2003.11.11"]
[ECO "D45"]

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 d5 4. d4 c6 5. e3 a6 6. c5 Nbd7 7. b4 a5 8. b5 e5 9. Qa4 Qc7 10. Ba3 e4 11. Nd2 Be7 12. b6 Qd8 13. h3 O-O 14. Nb3 Bd6 15. Rb1 Be7 16. Nxa5 Nb8 17. Bb4 Qd7 18. Rb2 Qe6 19. Qd1 Nfd7 20. a3 Qh6 21. Nb3 Bh4 22. Qd2 Nf6 23. Kd1 Be6 24. Kc1 Rd8 25. Rc2 Nbd7 26. Kb2 Nf8 27. a4 Ng6 28. a5 Ne7 29. a6 bxa6 30. Na5 Rdb8 31. g3 Bg5 32. Bg2 Qg6 33. Ka1 Kh8 34. Na2 Bd7 35. Bc3 Ne8 36. Nb4 Kg8 37. Rb1 Bc8 38. Ra2 Bh6 39. Bf1 Qe6 40. Qd1 Nf6 41. Qa4 Bb7 42. Nxb7 Rxb7 43. Nxa6 Qd7 44. Qc2 Kh8 45. Rb3 1-0

[Event "X3D Match"]
[Site "New York USA"]
[Date "2003.11.18"]
[Round "4"]
[White "X3D FRITZ"]
[Black "Kasparov,G"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[BlackElo "2830"]
[EventDate "2003.11.11"]
[ECO "D27"]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 dxc4 3. Nf3 e6 4. e3 a6 5. Bxc4 c5 6. O-O Nf6 7. Bb3 cxd4 8. exd4 Nc6 9. Nc3 Be7 10. Re1 O-O 11. Bf4 Na5 12. d5 Nxb3 13. Qxb3 exd5 14. Rad1 Be6 15. Qxb7 Bd6 16. Bg5 Rb8 17. Qxa6 Rxb2 18. Bxf6 Qxf6 19. Qxd6 Qxc3 20. Nd4 Rxa2 21. Nxe6 fxe6 22. Qxe6+ Kh8 23. Rf1 Qc5 24. Qxd5 Rfxf2 25. Rxf2 Qxf2+ 26. Kh1 h6 27. Qd8+ Kh7 1/2-1/2
 

Henry

Senior Member
Sep 30, 2003
5,517
#10
good thread!!!!!!! just noticed it! I had totally forgoten about these matches! lol-I really think we should avoid the Fischer debate!
 

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