Jason Bourne (1 Viewer)

Martin

Senior Member
Dec 31, 2000
56,812
#1
I just finished Bourne Identity. Might as well give my notes now or I'll forget stuff. The story is very good, and I probably would have liked it more if not for the fact that I've seen the 2002 movie and the 1988 for-tv mini series. I knew too much of the plot, the first half or so was a bit tedious. The tangled web revealed later on is very well done indeed, a classic Ludlum piece.

What struck me about this book is that his writing style is different from what I'm used to, perhaps he evolved as a writer. He will say things like "the two men were out of place in that street", as a vague way of conveying the espionage activities of Bourne. In his later books he was much more precise and detailed about these things, not just "out of place", but he would describe it more accurately. If you recall from the Hollywood production, the first movie reflects this, Bourne is sort of a vigilant guy who can spot things just a little while before others do, In the later movies he becomes so much more deliberate, his awareness at a whole other level. Perhaps this too is a reflection on the later books. That is not to say necessarily that Bourne has changed, just Ludlum describing him in a different way.

The analytical Marie is an excellent character, far stronger than the movie ones. She's so much more than just "moral support", she drives the story almost as much as he does.

The story is told top down, and I think I prefer it the other way around. The reader doesn't know everything that's going on, but he knows the big picture, vital details. I prefer Ludlum when the reader is side by side with the protagonist, knowing no more than he does, discovering the world with him.

Having read the book, I admire the choices they made with the movies. Everyone knows translating a book into a movie never works, so what they did was a very liberal sweep of storytelling devices, not even feeling committed to the plot, and sort of reconstructed a new story out of those large pieces. The fingerprint at Treadstone 71, they used that ploy to locate Bourne in Berlin in "Supremacy". Same idea, totally different story.

Have you guys been keeping up with the Van Lustbader books? Are they any good?
 
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Martin

Martin

Senior Member
Dec 31, 2000
56,812
#3
Well I've tried to make it clear that the movies don't follow the books (at least not the first one). It's basically a different story with similar characteristics.
 

Il Re

-- 10 --
Jan 13, 2005
4,031
#4
i see, i might have to look into it, i've read numerous books in which i've seen the film first and been dissapointed after (mainly philip k dick - total recall, minority report) but on the other hand the novels jurassic park and lost world by micheal crichton which were both way better than the movies, i thought the films were decent so the books will have to match up
 

Osman

Koul Khara!
Aug 30, 2002
49,748
#5
i was thinking of reading the books, but then thought, i've seen the films so whats the point right?
I have read 3 of the books, and there have been 3 films. The first one is closest in sharing similar confusing backstory and struggles, superficial similarities (unknown identity, his being chased, but didnt bring who is chasing him, like in the book, thats 90% of the story in the book). But thats where it stops, they have NOTHING else in common basically (and in this case, its a good thing in a way).

They went to a totally another direction story ways, a way more lighter and simpler take on it (its bad mostly because Hollywoodizing the Marie character, way better in the book, plus the enemy is 10 times more interesting in the book), while still implenting the essence of what Jason Bourne really is like, how he operates and what drives him.

You have seen the second movie, and the 2nd book is ALL about 80s China/Hong Kong etc. Quite marvellous view of that era and culture, but has nothing to do with the 2nd movie. Same with the 3rd film and 3rd book, you have to scrutinize real hard to find similarities.
 

Osman

Koul Khara!
Aug 30, 2002
49,748
#7
Hehe, reading books is great. Its a fantastic outlet and experience for your imagination, for lack of better words.
 

Osman

Koul Khara!
Aug 30, 2002
49,748
#10
I couldnt find any Jansen in his books catalogue. Whats is it about?


And apparently, Hollywood are banking big time on more of his books. A book called The Chancellor Manuscript with Di Caprio as the lead. And The Matarese Circle with Denzel Washington as the lead. Thats two highly talented cash cow actors, they mean bussiness.
 

Enron

Tickle Me
Moderator
Oct 11, 2005
69,173
#11
It's his last few books. Jansen is an aging operative still trying to keep up in a younger world. It's a reflection of Ludlum's aging self. Let me see if I can find it.
 

Enron

Tickle Me
Moderator
Oct 11, 2005
69,173
#14
I couldnt find any Jansen in his books catalogue. Whats is it about?


And apparently, Hollywood are banking big time on more of his books. A book called The Chancellor Manuscript with Di Caprio as the lead. And The Matarese Circle with Denzel Washington as the lead. Thats two highly talented cash cow actors, they mean bussiness.
I can't saw I've ever read a bad Robert Ludlum. Some of Tom Clany's books can get old, but Ludlum keeps it fresh somehow.
 

Bozi

The Bozman
Administrator
Oct 18, 2005
22,733
#17
@easy-have to look that out. am a big fan of Ludlum's having read the Bourne books and a few of his others.
the Bourne books are tremendous and as stated before, have nothing really to do with the films other than the loss of memory,both are excellent in their own right
 

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