Capello to Juve: a contradiction? (1 Viewer)

baggio

Senior Member
Jun 3, 2003
19,250
#1
I'll start by saying, that Im obviously delighted at the appointment of our new coach: Fabio Capello. Atleast on paper.
But the more i think about this, the more i wonder, if we just shot ourselves in the foot, by bringing him to Juve. Yes, he's brilliant. He's proven himself over and over, with Roma, Milan and Real. He's won everything there is to win. But i think thats whats bothering me. He's done it all. Here we are, in a process of rebuilding a team, that has just ended a winning cycle. Here we are, hoping to bring in some young blood. But to be honest, i dont know how we're about to balance a veteran coach with potential young stars. Would Prandelli or Deschamps been a better option? Lippi came in as fresh new coach, and it took him all of 10 years to bring this team up. After all, isnt that the reason he left us in the first place: for the lack of new ideas. Which is what i fear a little bit in Capello. He's been around too long and been too successful to bring new ideas with him. He is the tried and tested formula and has peaked as a coach imo.

Do you guys think its been a contradiction of sorts bringing him to Juve?
 

Stu

Senior Member
Jul 14, 2002
17,556
#3
I guess it is a contradiction of sorts, but Capello is a fantastic coach so I'm not too worried.
 

Vinman

2013 Prediction Cup Champ
Jul 16, 2002
11,480
#5
I'm not worried.... this is a new challenge for Fabio, and I think he'll bring us a championship- be it the scudetto or Europe, in a short time
 

KB824

Senior Member
Sep 16, 2003
30,874
#6
I'm not worried either, DJ. The fact that he has always been able to incorporate young stars with veteran players and has been very successful wherever he goes doing this alleviates any fears that I would have had.

In fact, I feel more confident now that young players will be brought in and put into the mix now that Cappello is here than if either DD or Prandelli were hired.

Being able to succeed at Monaco and Parma, respectively, with that type of formula is one thing, but Juve management may have felt the need to field an entirley veteran-laden team if one of those two were hired, for the fear that if the experiment didn't work, then the media would have had a field day with the new coach, basically stating that he couldn't handle the pressure and his choice of players don't work at such a big club.

Cappello has proven time and again that similar tactic and player selection does work on the big stage.
 

aressandro10

Senior Member
Jul 30, 2003
2,884
#7
capello have been successfull in all the 3 clubs he managed so far.. so oddds are he will be successful also with Juventus.. so at this point , there is no base at all to be worried..
 
Jan 7, 2004
29,704
#8
the only thing that worries me is that cappello seems to be just leaving the clubs he manages after some years. well if he wants to leave in 3-4 years we can still get dd. if he is still around.
 

Elnur_E65

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2004
10,848
#9
You think that changing manager frequently is a bad thing? I think it's a good strategy... as long as the coach is not treated the way Madrid treated Vicente Del Bosque
 

Togon

Senior Member
Nov 2, 2003
511
#13
++ [ originally posted by baggio ] ++
Lippi came in as fresh new coach, and it took him all of 10 years to bring this team up.

In this aspect you are certainly wrong, Lippi came to Juve for the first time in 1994, after legendary coach left:
Giovanni Trapattoni 1991-1994
Marcello Lippi 1994-98

he started to win trophies right after his arrival, with a team highlighted by the names like Deschampes, Jugovic, Vialli, Baggio and the very young DP

94-95 scudetto
95-96 Champions League
1996 European Super Cup, Intercontinental Cup
96-97 scudetto

the second time he coached Juventus (2001-2004), he started with three big signings: Buffon, Nedved, Thuram, and he kept winning.

2001-2002 scudetto
2002-2003 scudetto

So all I want to say is, and thats pretty obvious, Lippi didnt need ten years to build this team, he just worked with what he got, and strenghtened it as he could, or as he thought it was needed. I think the same can be done by Capello.
 

Torkel

f(s+1)=3((s +1)-1=3s
Jul 12, 2002
3,537
#14
I don't think there's a contradiction, more a good reason. Capello wouldn't have signed for us if we weren't a challenge. He brought long awaited glory to Madrid and buildt the Roma team that actually is capable of winning something. He likes a challenge.
 

Trezeguet_FC

Senior Member
Mar 26, 2003
1,888
#15
I doubt Capello would have joined Juve after we had a successful campain. The main reason why he wanted to join, was to bring Juve back up. And once he brings Juve back, I can see him leaving for a club outside of italy...
 

the phoenix

Junior Member
Aug 8, 2002
92
#16
How about this for a thought. Capello could be very good for bringing young players (yeah yeah we all know that so nothing new). What I mean how good could this be for lets say Kapo? Maresca? or even Micco. We all don't like Cassano very much but have to admit he has played well this season and I think it has something to do with Capello. Even Lippi was a little envy with Capello's patience with Cassano. Like I said it was just a thought.
 

swag

L'autista
Administrator
Sep 23, 2003
75,746
#17
Capello is a professional. He's not in the gig for the paycheck and to be all fat and happy, sitting on his past glories. So suggesting that a coach of his caliber may not be in it for a championship every time he fields a team sounds like a serious undersell.

Juve is a pressure cooker compared to the coaching job at, say, Roma. Maybe not all that different from Real Madrid, etc., but I don't think he would have considered leaving what he strongly built at Roma to come to a team he's had a questionable public rapport with if it wasn't for the challenge.

You could make the argument that Roma's financial troubles could have created a situation where he was abandoning a sinking ship. But of all the teams Capello could have left for (Chelsea, even Inter, etc.), on the surface there are more reasons to suspect that Capello would come to Juve only if he was looking for a real challenge.
 
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baggio

baggio

Senior Member
Jun 3, 2003
19,250
#18
Im sure Capello hasnt done it for the money. He hasnt done it for the recognition. He has all of that. The only apprehension that remains: can Capello get any better with his ideas and tactics? I for one, dont think so. His career is too damn illustrous.
And thats not to say those same ideas wont click at Juve. But i guess there's as much chance of him becoming a "has been" as there is a chance of us regaining our glory.
 
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baggio

baggio

Senior Member
Jun 3, 2003
19,250
#19
++ [ originally posted by Togon ] ++



In this aspect you are certainly wrong, Lippi came to Juve for the first time in 1994, after legendary coach left:
Giovanni Trapattoni 1991-1994
Marcello Lippi 1994-98

So all I want to say is, and thats pretty obvious, Lippi didnt need ten years to build this team, he just worked with what he got, and strenghtened it as he could, or as he thought it was needed. I think the same can be done by Capello.
It makes an interesting note. Trapattoni left Juve at the height of his powers. And left behind the likes of players such as Deschamps, Vialli, Jugovic and Baggio.

Thats where i think the balance was struck, coz Lippi came in as a new coach with fresh ideas, even though the players had been used exhaustively to Trappatoni's tactics. They dint stagnate because of the new creativity and enthusiasm Lippi injected in to the team.

The reason he lasted that long was because of the freshness. If we are building for a stable future, id like to think Capello can last long enough to help us in that quest.
 

Layce Erayce

Senior Member
Aug 11, 2002
9,116
#20
++ [ originally posted by baggio ] ++
Im sure Capello hasnt done it for the money. He hasnt done it for the recognition. He has all of that. The only apprehension that remains: can Capello get any better with his ideas and tactics? I for one, dont think so. His career is too damn illustrous.
And thats not to say those same ideas wont click at Juve. But i guess there's as much chance of him becoming a "has been" as there is a chance of us regaining our glory.
i dont think people understand what your getting at. ill say this however:

we should do well under him- as people say. but the new juve wont be radically different. in fact it wouldnt be fresh, since capello's ideas arent fresh(which is what your getting at i know).

which concerns me because id like to see a uniquely different kind of juve. not just the ordinary "out with the old in with the new, change of formation and voila!" new juve.

capello's juve will be more traditional. and id rather not have that. but nobody can tell really, cuz nobody heres made a practice of predicting managerial moves.

sutnop brought this up somewhere im sure- about how capello is the older generation, and theres a new generation of coaches
 

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